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Oct 23 | 2015
Changing People And Places In Your Addiction
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Changing People, Places and Things During Addiction

Getting clean and sober in drug rehabilitation is no simple task. Just the thought of the massive changes that are suggested as a program of recovery can scare you away—until the next bottom.

Don’t they know alcoholics and addicts hate change?

Don’t panic. Everything your treatment specialists and counselors at the drug and alcohol treatment center is only a suggestion. But think it through, and remember you’ve made it this far, you’re feeling good thanks to 90 days in drug rehab and you’re willing to go to any lengths to maintain your sobriety.

Changing for Addiction Treatment

They say when it comes to recovery, the only thing you have to change is everything. And what’s that we hear? More panic? Hang on to what you’ve learned in treatment for addiction and you’ll make it through.

Current research indicates that 90 days is the necessary period of time one should spend in residential treatment to foster long-term recovery. Research shows people who complete 90 consecutive days of residential treatment are 35% more likely to maintain 5 years of unbroken recovery then people who don’t, for whatever reason, complete 90 days of treatment. The Authentic Recovery Center, a drug and alcohol rehab in Los Angeles, California offers an inpatient 90-day program with comprehensive treatment options designed to meet the needs of every individual seeking help.

And after three months, away from the triggers of everyday life including certain people, places and things that hold you back from the happiness and the clean and sober life that’s waiting for you?

What will you change during drug treatment

People. How many of your friends visited or called you in drug rehabilitation? The list probably doesn’t include your drug dealer, your friends from the bar (whose last names you don’t even know) or anyone who was ever hurt or negatively affected by your drinking and drugging. Consider this a blessing; they’ve done half the work already when it comes to letting people go out of your life, the ones who say they’ll buy you a cocktail to celebrate or even trade one for your 90 chip from drug and alcohol treatment. And the rest? You’ll figure it out once you’ve been clean and sober for a bit of time, and those people will start to fall away.

Places. You have no reason to pull up a bar stool at your favorite watering hole and regale everyone with stories about your time in drug and alcohol rehabilitation. They’ll probably stop listening the moment they hear the words “rehab,” “sober” or “AA.” If you’re there to get them all to quit drinking and join you on the sober path, it won’t work. Now get out of there, and get yourself to a meeting.

Things. Changing things? You’re back to panic mode. You can’t imagine taking off that chain around your neck with the razor blade charm, throwing away your bong or anything else that reminds you of your old life—certain routines, photos, even clothing. And how’s your attitude after all this emotional pain and upheaval? That counts, too. You’re sober now. The last thing you need is to keep this stuff around for you to romanticize or regret the past.

Only you can change during Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment

It’s up to you to decide what your recovery is going to look like. Entering rehab, taking the 12 steps to heart and creating a new life is hard, but never impossible.



Jul 15 | 2015
ARC is In-Network With Anthem Blue Cross
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Addiction Treatment In-Network With Anthem Blue Cross

We are proud to announce that every level of care offered at Authentic Recovery Center is now covered in-network by Anthem Blue Cross and all Blue Cross affiliates. It is now easier than ever to get the treatment that you or a loved one deserve. Now that ARC is in-network with Anthem Blue Cross we would like to take a minute to further explain the how this benefits everybody. Anthem contracts with a wide range of doctors, specialists, hospitals, labs, pharmacies, and now drug and alcohol treatment centers. These are the providers in your “network.” Each of these providers has agreed to accept your plan’s contracted rate as payment in full for services.

You’ve probably seen the terms “in-network” and “out-of-network” on your Anthem Blue Cross plan description. You’ve probably also seen the acronyms PPO, HMO, or EPO all over the Internet, or heard them in the doctors office. Hopefully we can help explain the benefits of Authentic Recovery Center being in-network with Anthem Blue Cross

Insurance coverage for drug and alcohol treatment programs can vary greatly, depending on the type of plan, and whether it’s public, private or group insurance. As frustrating as it can be to navigate your way through complicated coverage options at what is sure to be an emotional time, it’s important to remember your health is more important than anything. Anthem Blue Cross and Authentic Recovery Center want to make it as easy as possible to get whatever level of care is needed for you or a loved one.

In-Network Coverage for Drug and Alcohol Treatment Comes In Different Forms

Insurance companies have come to understand alcoholism and addiction as very treatable medical conditions. Prior to the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014, insurance coverage choices were relatively limited, and out-of-pocket costs were unfortunately not affordable. But insurers, like Anthem Blue Cross now, more than ever, recognize the psychiatric and physical effects of substance abuse and how they manifest over time, and have started to offer more rehabilitation provisions as a preventative measure.

Private Insurance.
While it costs more money compared to public insurance, the options available for healthcare are much broader and comprehensive, which can be a huge benefit during times when family members and others find their lives have been severely affected by a member’s alcoholism or drug addiction.

Private insurance refers to health insurance plans that are paid for by an employer or an individual person, and not subsidized by the federal government or any of its agencies. Rehabilitation options can include inpatient drug or alcohol rehab for what would be considered an extended stay—90 days, or longer. High-end facilities offer patients the chance to take advantage of luxurious amenities while receiving medically-managed detox and intensive, one-on-one counseling with licensed professionals, experiential therapists and certified substance abuse counselors to address any underlying dual diagnosis mental or behavioral disorders, such as clinical depression or bipolar disorder. Amenities may include fine cuisine, massage and fitness instructors, to name a few. Certain holistic treatment approaches, including Eastern practices such as acupuncture, meditation, yoga and herbal treatments in conjunction with traditional treatment may be covered.

Group Insurance.
Several group insurance packages include provisions for addiction rehab. Group plans can offer psychological health benefits and these funds, when made available, usually cover plans for alcohol and drug detox, residential hospitalization, long-term inpatient treatment and individual and group outpatient support. The main obstacle here is fear of losing work, and because of that some people refrain from taking advantage of their benefits.

Public Insurance.
Affordable inpatient drug and alcohol rehab treatment for people whose insurance does not cover behavioral or substance addiction. There are treatment facilities that are partially or entirely subsidized by the government, and these facilities accept state or federal medical insurance plans for full or partial payment of services. However, specific income guidelines are put in place for these plans, so clients should check with the rehab facility they are planning to enroll in or the right public insurance agency to determine if they are really qualified to avail themselves of public insurance programs that include addiction rehab.

Insurers traditionally base their approval for coverage regarding treatment for alcohol and drug rehab on what is known as “medical necessity” as defined by the insurer—not treatment professionals. Treatment plans must meet professional medical standards, the insurer may still reject a proposed treatment if it is inconsistent with other elements, such as costs and the recommended length of rehab dependent on the severity of the addiction or any co-occurring disorders.

Check if your Anthem Blue Cross In Network Coverage will work for you!

Before considering entering into any drug or alcohol rehab program, understand whether treatment is provided under your drug rehab insurance coverage. Finding treatment for alcoholism and drug dependency is one of the biggest hurdles toward recovery, and many people unfortunately give up at this point on their decision to get clean and sober. Again, not that Authentic Recovery center is in-network with Anthem Blue Cross finding the appropriate level of care is easier than ever.

Find out what your insurance covers for rehab, by filling out our online insurance verification form.



May 06 | 2015
National Mental Health Month
Mental Health Awareness

How Should We Treat Mental Health And Addiction?

Drug and alcohol rehab centers, medical professionals and psychological teams are getting more adept at identifying and treating patients with mental health and substance abuse issues.

When we think about cancer, heart disease, or diabetes, we don’t wait years to treat them. We start before Stage 4—we begin with prevention. When people are in the first stage of those diseases, and are beginning to show signs of symptoms like a persistent cough, high blood pressure, or high blood sugar, we try immediately to reverse these symptoms. We don’t ignore them. In fact, we develop a plan of action to reverse and sometimes stop the progression of the disease.

So why aren’t we doing the same for individuals who are dealing with potentially serious mental illness or drug addiction?

Understanding the Roots of Mental Health Treatment

There was a time, not so long ago when mental health treatment included shame-based therapies, electric shock therapy, Morphine. LSD and frontal lobotomies. In the early 1920’s,15 states had passed a law for the sterilization of alcoholics thanks to the theory that alcoholism, along with other medical disorders and self-destructive behaviors were purely genetic conditions, one that got stronger with every generation.

As baffling as the drink and drug habit was, the crazier the cure. And still to this day, the medical community, mental health counselors and frustrated spouses are all trying to unravel the psyche of the person who just will not stop abusing drugs and alcohol. Why can’t they see they’re carrying on at their own peril? Not to mention dragging down broken-hearted family members, friends and just about everyone else in their immediate proximity?

No matter how frustrating and difficult it is to understand, more likely than not they have no idea themselves why they can’t stop. This is what addiction science is attempting to understand.

Dual diagnosis, or co-occurring disorders refers to a mental illness coupled with substance abuse. Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and other more or less grave or complicated disorders are often misdiagnosed in patients with drug addiction issues when the addiction, in fact, may have been the panacea to a pre-existing mental illness. And when only one side of the problem manifests itself as the dominant issue, it’s easy to miss what lies beneath.

Underlying psychological or psychiatric conditions can mimic the destructive path of addiction, making it harder to recognize and properly treat the entire picture. Mental and emotional instability, chronic relapse, rehabilitation centers, hospitalizations, homelessness, HIV and hepatitis infections are included in the laundry list of challenges people with co-occurring disorders face.

Some treatment philosophies are rooted in the idea that many people essentially abuse alcohol or drugs to self-medicate often severe conditions that may or may not have been diagnosed.

The Authentic Recovery Center is a California addiction treatment center specializing in dual diagnosis. They understand there are many contributing factors to substance abuse and offer each client personalized attention so they can receive the benefit of the most advanced and comprehensive clinical techniques available to successfully overcome their addiction to drugs and alcohol.

They are fundamentally different in this regard. Many people that enroll with ARC have been to multiple treatment centers or have tried to stop drinking and using on their own. In many circumstances the primary reason for a lack of sustainable success with recovery is simply because there are core psychological or psychiatric issues that have not been addressed and properly treated. In order for addiction treatment to be effective the core issues that culminate in substance abuse have to be addressed during the initial stages of treatment and must persist throughout all phases of recovery.

How Can You Help Support Mental Health Awareness?

This May is Mental Health Month; Authentic Recovery Center is raising awareness of the important role mental health plays in our lives and encouraging members of the community to learn more about their own mental health and to take action immediately if they are experiencing symptoms of a mental illness.

Mental illnesses and drug addiction/alcoholism are not only common, they are treatable. There is a wide variety of treatment options for mental illnesses ranging from talk therapy to medication to peer support, and it may take some time for a person to find the right treatment or combination of treatments that works best for them. But when they do, the results can be truly amazing and life changing. Authentic Recovery Center wants to help people learn what they can do both to protect their mental health and know the signs of mental illness.

Addiction is no longer being viewed as a moral problem, or the result of a lack of willpower. Countless elements acquired over a lifetime contribute to the complicated profile of the person suffering. More sophisticated drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs address the underlying causes of substance abuse and treat the core mental health issues along with the addiction.

We strongly encourage everybody to research more and support in anyway you see fit! Two of the causes we support are NAMI and Mental Health America.



Apr 02 | 2015
Insurance Covered Drug Rehab

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Tips to understanding payment options for treatment – especially if you need to act fast. Family members, clients, and even seasoned professionals get overwhelmed by navigating the payment options for substance abuse treatment services. Should you pay privately, should you use your insurance – and if you do, will that affect ongoing medical coverage or future employment? What will insurance cover for drug rehab? Will my insurance cover a detox from drugs and alcohol or an IOP program?

Insurance Covered Drug Rehab

The questions about the right thing to do are virtually endless…
A family member recently asked us to verify their insurance benefits for a loved one to enroll in a drug rehab. But without understanding how insurance works for drug treatment programs the information we provide after verifying is of little help. So to learn what it all means, we’ve provided 3 simple tips to helping people understand the insurance verification process.

Use cash and enroll now or use insurance and prepare for some serious red tape.
No matter what, using cash is the easiest way to access substance abuse services. It’s also the most private, and most unlikely way to ever have an issue about having received substance abuse treatment in the future. Cash offers total privacy and total control. These are two elements that whenever possible, shouldn’t be overlooked. Insurance benefits are laden with red tape. When you’re in crisis the process can be unwaveringly slow. So if you need to place someone immediately private payment is almost always the way to go. Before an insurance company will authorize any form of treatment you have to give them a lot of information first. Then they will verify what form of coverage you have (if any). After that they will probably request some additional information. Then, if you’re lucky, they will authorize a set number of days. Then they will request more information about why further treatment is medically necessary.

Then they will verify your coverage and…See a pattern emerging?

So no question about it, if you can afford to pay for treatment privately it the the best option.. Most PPO insurance plans offer In Network and Out of Network options. They will usually provide more coverage if you stay In Network then if you choose to go Out of Network. A lot of times the drug rehab you want to attend will be a non-preferred provider (Out of Network) and this means if go that route you will be responsible for more of the costs.

Out of Network treatment and the little known SUPERBILL
When you want to go to a specific Out of Network drug treatment program you can choose to get a Superbill. This means that at the end of treatment you will get a reimbursement check instead of the facility. With a Superbill, you pay the entire cost of treatment upfront and then get reimbursed directly from the insurance company. This is usually better for you financially in the long run if you go to treatment Out of Network. The sad fact is that you can go to any program you want if you have an insurance plan that offers Out of Network coverage. The insurance companies really, really, REALLY discourage you from going this route. That’s quite simply because it ends up costing them more money.

Not All Insurance Covered Drug Rehabs Offer The Same Thing

Out of Pocket Maximums
In addition to having an In Network and Out of Network option on most PPO plans, there will also be an Out of Pocket Maximum. This means that once you reach a predetermined amount in patient payment responsibilities, the insurance will cover at 100% going forward. To determine what your Out of Pocket Maximum is on your PPO plan simply call the 800 number on the back of your insurance card and ask them what your Out of Pocket Maximum is for Substance Abuse treatment.

Deductibles
An unfortunate aspect of the Out of Pocket Maximum is that is often doesn’t include your deductible. In other words, the deductible on your PPO insurance might be $2500.00 per person on the plan, with a Family Aggregate of $10,000.00. In this scenario, if you went In Network, you would more than likely be responsible for the 20% (at least) for the duration of the whole treatment episode. Remember to ask them if your deductible is included in your Out of Pocket Maximum. When the insurance company says they will cover 60% of substance abuse treatment you will have out of pocket expenses (often not including your deductible) up to, but not exceeding, a set dollar amount. So if your out of pocket maximum is $10,000.00 you will have to pay 40% up to $10,000.00. After that the insurance company will cover 100% of authorized services.

Mental Health Insurance Covered Drug Rehab And Alcohol Treatment

How Mental Health Benefits Can Help Offset Costs
Remember, insurance benefits are broken up into several categories. The two that are most relevant to you are the Behavior Health (outlined in the previous section) and Mental Health benefits. When you go to a co-occurring disorders treatment facility, or dual diagnosis program, you can effectively bill for any behavioral and mental health issues that you presently have. This can be very helpful with both Out of Network coverage and when Superbilling.

The breakdown for mental health coverage in terms of In and Out of Network benefits, deductibles, and out of pocket maximums is very much the same as their behavioral health counterparts. However, it’s important to specify the coverage type your seeking when calling your insurance company to verify benefits information.

Call to Learn More about Insurance Covered Drug Rehab And Alcohol Treatment Options in Los Angeles

If you would like more information about both private pay and insurance-based substance abuse treatment options in Los Angeles call 1 877 267 4673 to speak with a counselor today. The reality is that the landscapes in the private-pay sector and the insurance-based arena are very complex in the greater Los Angeles area. It can be very helpful to have the support and guidance of an expert who can assist you in determining which program options will be the best fit for your situation, and we can assist in verifying insurance benefits.



Feb 05 | 2015
Addiction Recovery Center

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Addiction is a complex condition which affects all areas of life and can result in medical complications or fatality. In some cases the physical and emotional impact of addiction is noticeable immediately and at other times the corrosive qualities of active addiction are most evident over a period of time. Enrollment in a qualified drug addiction recovery center can halt the addictive process in any stage of its development. Effective addiction treatment with ARC represents a supportive measure that helps individuals or their loved ones successfully arrest and treats all kinds of addictions in a comfortable, healing atmosphere.

Our ARC Los Angeles Addiction Recovery Center Is Built Around The Individual

This insistence on gauging services according to the needs of the individual goes to the heart ARC’s guiding philosophy: because addiction reflects the inner workings of the addict’s personality, treatment measures must reflect these differences and strive to honor each person’s unique set of issues.

Each client, outside of individual therapy attends an addiction recovery center that includes a curriculum of addiction education, relapse prevention, substance abuse counseling, 12-step education, experiential groups and outside activities. Additionally, ARC provides relationship counseling and a family program when necessary. When clients have co-occurring conditions or dual diagnosis, emotional needs or behavioral issues then the personalized treatment plan is tailored to address and meet these individual requirements. In these instances the entire clinical team assembles their collective experience to provide therapeutic resources that support resolution of any additional co-occurring issues. It is usually recommended that individuals enroll in an addiction recovery setting when the negative elements present in the individual’s life outweigh the positive elements that can motivate and fuel a sustainable addiction recovery process.

Do Addiction Recovery Centers Really Work?

The question of whether or not it will work is dependent both on the quality and methodologies incorporated by the addiction treatment center and the individual who is undergoing addiction recovery. The key to achieving addiction recovery is in defining individuated treatment planning and utilizing clinical modalities to assist people in understanding the underlying issues that are contributing the pathology of self-destructive behavior.

Without a broad focus on solving the addiction paradigm individuals in our experience will inevitably relapse. Our treatment philosophy at our addiction recovery center is that sustainable addiction recovery requires an addiction treatment process that provides insight into the manifestation of the addictive pathology along with a subsequent therapeutic pathway towards resolution for the issues that are fueling that pathology. Our addiction recovery center in Los Angeles is designed to address the emotional pathology that fuels the addictive process. Our philosophy is that without this clinical support to understand and begin resolution for the underlying internal and environmental influences that have contributed to the addictive process, addiction treatment will only delay relapse, not prevent it.

What Does Undergoing Drug Addiction Recovery Accomplish?

Treatment helps individuals to become productive, healthy, positive contributors to themselves and to the world around them. More often than not, many people who need treatment actually want to be sober deep down. So, if that’s the case why do traditional drug addiction treatment centers often fail in helping clients to achieve this objective? The key to the Authentic Recovery Center’s success in providing effective addiction treatment is our innovative clinical philosophy. Essentially this philosophy is focused on the fact that the best treatment setting will be one where a treatment environment is created in such a way that the individual is not segregated completely from certain aspects of everyday living, but is rather protected specifically from the negative aspects of everyday living that might overwhelm them and cause them to relapse.

In essence, if an individual feels like they are staying sober and productive in a more true-to-life scenario like those offered in the ARC addiction treatment Los Angeles center they will also experience the positive results that will motivate them to want to continue to stay sober. Due to this more progressive clinical philosophy they will be less likely to be shell-shocked once they leave the center because they will have practiced applicable tools for staying clean and sober in this more true-to-life daily routine. Authentic Recovery Center offers numerous addiction treatment programs with all this in mind and more. ARC provides one of the most effective and individualized addiction treatment centers in the United States because of the programs focus on methodologies that are clinically advanced, empirically-based and proven to work.

Addiction treatment at ARC is designed to meet the early needs of clients beginning the journey of recovery. The focus of our treatment philosophy is on the underlying issues that have contributed to the addictive process. Understanding how difficult the recovery road can be, each clients personalized treatment plan takes into account future considerations for aftercare that meet each clients continuing recovery needs



Dec 15 | 2014
Types Of Drug Abuse
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Different Types Of Drug Abuse

Any substance, medication, compound or drug that induces either altered states of consciousness, euphoria, or both can be abused. Most of this abuse can lead to sever withdrawal which needs a medically managed detox if the individual wants to stop. The many types of drug abused covers the entire spectrum of compounds and their corresponding effects; and is not limited to illegal drugs. Types of drug abuse can include both illegitimate substances acquired on the street, in addition to substances acquired legally through doctors (it should be pointed out that drugs can be obtained legally through a doctor in ways that are entirely unscrupulous).

Alcohol- The Most Common Type Of Drug Abuse
Alcohol generates short term euphoria and sedation. Perhaps the most widely abused substance available. Prolonged Abuse induces severe physical handicaps, liver damage, and, eventually, mental health deterioration. Alcohol can act as a hypnotic sedatives. It works by depressing the central nervous system and slowing down bodily functions such as heart-rate, blood pressure, and breathing. Alcohol generates a variety of effects that run the gamut from minor sedation to complete anesthesia. Combined with the high amount of sugar found in most beverages creates a dangerous combination of a mild stimulant and a powerful depressant. Signs of alcohol abuse include: slurred speech, impaired motor functioning, impaired judgment, staggering behaviors.

Narcotics
Narcotics derive from the Greek word for benumb (Narko). Medically it refers to a type of drug abuse that induced sleep or have analgesic, pain-killing properties. Today it is most commonly associated with drugs that fall into the classification of Opiates, such as Morphine, Heroin, and their analogs like Hydrocodone (Vicodin). However, since the legal definition of Narcotics differs from the medical definition, there are actually two different classifications that consequently cover a broad range of psycho-active compounds and drugs. The first type of drug abuse to truly be labeled as a Narcotic was liquor, whose recorded use goes back to ancient times. The side effects of Narcotics intoxication include: drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, sense of apathy, decreased physical activity, constriction of the pupils, flushing of the face and neck, constipation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression.

Amphetamines
Amphetamines operate on the mesolimbic pathways by stimulating production of the neurotransmitters Dopamine and Nor-epinephrine. Amphetamines are one of the most widely abused drugs available today. Amphetamines generates a rush and high that is as intense as it is brief, creating a powerful reward stimulus-loop that inevitably, over time, leads to more use, with each subsequent dose reinforcing the next. Amphetamines first appeared en masse in urban neighborhoods in the early to mid-1990’s, and quickly evolved into public health crises of epidemic proportions, affecting hundreds of thousands of people regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, or socio-economic status.

Prescription Types of Drug Abuse

Prescription drug addiction covers an enormous array of different medications designed to treat a variety of ailments. The vast majority of prescription types of drug abuse are relatively harmless, at least with regards to addiction, and covers the entire spectrum of both physical and mental health ailments. Prescription drugs cover all manner of mental health issues. However, with regards to Abuse Potential, the medications of interest include Stimulants, such as Ritalin and Adderall (used for the treatment of ADHD), sedatives and tranquilizers, and Narcotic Painkillers such as Percocet, Vicodin, or Morphine.

Benzodiazepines
Benzodiazepines are class of drugs known as hypnotic sedatives or minor tranquilizers. They work by depressing the central nervous system and slowing down bodily functions such as heart-rate, blood pressure, and breathing. Neurologically they act on what are called GABA receptors in the brain, which is an area of neuro-functioning associated with the pleasure center. There are a number of different Benzodiazepines available today: Xanax, Librium, Klonopin, Valium, Ativan.

Club Drugs
Club drugs refer to a variety of compounds that tends to be abused by adolescents, teen-agers, and young adults. These drugs span a fairly broad spectrum of substances that include both Stimulants and Depressants such as MDMA (ecstasy), GHB (Gamma-hydroxybutyric Acid), Ketamine Hydrochloride (Special K). Over the past decade they have become popular with people who go to raves, bars, concerts, and nightclubs. Because many of the drugs (although not all) are relatively new to the market, research regarding long-term effects are incomplete. Current data and statistics, however, indicate that this class of substances is most frequently abused by those within a specific youth culture, and as such poses certain clinical considerations with regards to treatment protocols that might be different from therapeutic approaches targeting an adult population of abusers.

Cocaine & Crack
Cocaine is a highly addictive, highly powerful stimulant that is derived from the Coco plant and typically comes in a powdered form. The powder can be snorted, injected, or cooked down into a compound that can be smoked called free-base or crack. With the exception of Methamphetamine, Cocaine is presently the single most abused stimulant in the country and is frequently used with depressants. In the 1970s the drug enjoyed a renaissance in popularity and was touted by experts as being non-addictive because it doesn’t have the physical symptoms of withdrawal one sees with Heroin or liquor or sedatives. After the explosion of crack in the mid 1980’s, however, opinion changed and it is now accepted that Cocaine’s has powerfully addicting psychological properties.

Hallucinogens
Hallucinogen types of drug abuse refer to a class of substances that fall into 3 distinct categories. These include what are known as Delriants, Psychedelics, and Dissociatives. Although there is overlap between the effects and symptoms of intoxication, drugs in each category tend to generate different experiences. Historically, the use of Hallucinogens goes back thousands of years. In different cultures they have been utilized for a variety of reasons, typically for religious ceremonies (for example Native Americans have taken Mescaline for centuries to induce spiritual experiences). In general, unlike the effects produced by opiates or stimulants, which are used for purely recreational reasons, the psychedelic experience is commonly associated with altered states of being or consciousness, with trance-like states, and with dreaming and meditation.

A Look At The Types Of Drug Abuse

Generally speaking, drugs of abuse fall into one of three categories: stimulants, narcotics, and sedatives. The federal government tightly regulates the prescribing criteria for each class of medication, whether it is an analgesic pain-killer or a stimulant. Drugs are rated according to their abuse potential, which refers to the intensity of the euphoria the drug induces, its onset, as well as its potential to generate tolerance and dependence. Many individuals struggling with dual diagnosis try to self medicate with the drugs listed above. This almost never works and is a clear cry for help.



Jun 01 | 2014
Alcohol Rehab

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Alcohol withdrawal is very dangerous and detox requires medical supervision to be conducted safely. If you need alcohol detoxification seek medical attention or call 1 877 415 4673 immediately.

What is involved in an Alcohol Rehab?

In the United States alcohol abuse is not a problem that should be taken lightly or overlooked. Therefore, a successful Los Angeles alcohol rehab will have to offer comprehensive services to address all these unique characteristics of gaining alcohol recovery. For alcoholics, or people abusing alcoholic beverages, there is often a sense that treatment needs to be specialized in order to be effective. In some senses – this perspective has a truism in philosophy. In other words, the approach for alcohol rehab has to be nuanced to address the specific needs facing the individual. This is because alcohol is legal and readily accessible world-wide. Unlike most illicit substances, alcoholics are constantly confronted by alcohol. You can purchase alcoholic beverages at virtually any store, or in any restaurant. This means that there needs to be an intense focus during the rehabilitation process on not only understanding the alcoholism recovery process, but in developing the skills required to navigate life constantly confronted by the presence of alcohol.

Alcohol Rehab Centers: Treatment Services And Detox From Alcohol/h3>
There are essentially three levels of care available for alcohol abuse treatment at Authentic Recovery Center. These are:

Alcohol Detox
The first step for many people exhibiting signs of alcohol dependence is detox. This level of care is designed to help people withdrawal safely from alcohol. As an important aspect of successful alcohol rehab, this layer of support helps people to establish a platform of abstinence but is not usually considered a full course of treatment without follow-up care. Clinically-based treatment settings are medically oriented and focused on providing the most advanced treatment possible. In order for an individual to truly take advantage of everything a treatment center has to offer, they must be clear of all mind altering substances. During this initial phase of care, assessment and diagnosis protocols (medical and psychiatric care) are administered to support the individual in building a treatment plan to address their basic recovery needs. After their alcohol detox has finished they are able to progress into a more comprehensive level of care and continue the process of healing.

Residential Treatment
Considered to be the most intensive form of alcohol rehab, inpatient treatment represents a residential aspect of the alcohol rehabilitation process. As mentioned above, clinically based treatment settings offer an array of treatment modalities to better cater to the alcoholics needs. This means that care is integrated across the mental and behavioral health spectrum and includes; individual therapy, group therapy, medical and psychiatric care, etc. Unlike the behavior-mod sector, these programs offer a detailed assessment process that is designed to address the co-occurring and dual diagnosis issues that contribute to addiction. These programs are clinically comprehensive, tend to be highly individualized, and are usually more expensive then their counterparts. Varying in scope, most inpatient treatment settings help problem drinkers to develop the skills and coping mechanisms required to maintain sobriety. Authentic Recovery Center offers clinical services designed to address the underlying causes that lead people to develop alcohol problems.
Outpatient Treatment
Intensive Outpatient Treatment, or IOP, is a non-residential form alcohol rehab. Like residential programs, outpatient rehabs vary in both scope and focus. Some outpatient alcohol rehab centers are based on the concept of clinical treatment (i.e., Dual Diagnosis) while others are based on principles of behavior-modification treatment (i.e., 12-step programs).

As with their residential counterparts, choosing the proper outpatient setting boils down to whether or not the individual needs comprehensive clinical care or is merely in need of additional support. Often required for problem drinkers who have had previously unsuccessful attempts at sobriety after detoxification, this level of care represents a stabilizing force for the newly sober alcoholic. In the event that there is a dual diagnosis issue at hand – then an outpatient that focuses on co-occurring disorders is advisable. If the situation is more or less simply related to drug addiction – then an outpatient program that is behavior-modification oriented will suffice. In some situations, outpatient alcohol rehab can be effectively accessed after detox, but in most situations outpatient symbolizes a supportive aftercare services after residential treatment is completed. Basically, if the individual is NOT physically dependent on alcohol, drugs, or prescription medications, they qualify for outpatient treatment.

Call Authentic Recovery Center Today to learn more about Alcohol Rehab, Alcohol Rehab Centers, and Alcohol Detox Programs

Authentic Recovery Center is a co-occurring disorders and alcohol rehabilitation program located in Los Angeles, California. Offering residential treatment to only 12 people at a time, the evidence-based services in our alcohol rehab represent the highest degree of individualized care. With numerous levels of care and outpatient treatment options the program offers multiple types of alcohol rehab services designed to support problem drinkers in a wide variety of scenarios. If you would like to learn more about our program call 1 877 415 4673 now.

Remember, “The only failure in life is the failure to act”.



May 15 | 2014
Drug Rehab
drug-rehab-los-angeles

What is Drug Rehab?

Drug rehab is a shortened term often used in place of drug rehabilitation. Traditionally, the idea of enrolling in a drug rehab program was for exactly that purpose: to rehabilitate a person exhibiting signs of addiction. Although our understanding of addiction has advanced significantly in the last century, many programs have not evolved alongside these breakthroughs in order to provide the most advanced rehabilitation available for the treatment of substance abuse disorders.

There are essentially two primary approaches for drug rehab:

  • Behavior Modification – This type of program offers the traditional treatment approach of counselor confrontation coupled with ongoing group therapy. The basic goal in a behavior modification drug rehabilitation center is to, “Break the addict down, to build them back up”.
  • Clinical Treatment – This type of program is designed to clinically assess each client for co-occurring disorders, and treat with specific one on one techniques any psychiatric or psychological issues that are discovered. The basic goal in clinical treatment settings is to view addiction as a symptom and to encourage the client to develop new skills in place of old habits.

Ultimately, all drug rehab centers fall into one of these two categories. Authentic Recovery Center is a clinically-based drug rehab. This is widely considered to be the most effective and advanced approach to the treatment of addition and substance abuse, as well as for clients with dual diagnosis disorders. Clinically focused treatment centers are capable of successfully treating people without a dual diagnosis, however behavior modification programs are not designed for people with complex psychological or psychiatric disorders. This is especially true for people that exhibit signs of Anxiety, Depression, Bipolar, and Attention Disorders.

When is Drug Rehab Necessary?
Drug rehab is necessary whenever substance abuse is creating any type of problem for the user, their friends, or their families. It doesn’t matter whether these problems are mild or severe. The question is not whether or not drug rehabilitation is necessary if problems are present. The only question is what method of drug rehabilitation is required. Entering a rehab for drugs may be one of the most difficult decisions anybody has to make, however it may be the most beneficial decisions anybody can make.

Methods for Drug Rehabilitation
To expand on the previous section, if problems are present then drug treatment is necessary. However, depending on the severity of the problems, certain specific types of rehabilitation may be more advisable than others. There are so many different kinds of rehab available to the general public. Each person has to find which form of drug rehab is going to be the best bet for them.

Types of Drug Rehab

There are essentially three different types of drug rehabilitation in the treatment setting. These are:

  1. Medical Drug Detox – This type of treatment is required whenever physical or chemical dependence is one of the presenting problems.
  2. Residential Inpatient Treatment – This type of treatment is required whenever the problems stemming from substance abuse are seriously impairing normal, healthy functioning.
  3. Outpatient Treatment – This type of treatment is required whenever the problems resulting from substance abuse are causing stress, but not serious life impairment.

If you are uncertain about which type of drug rehab is required in your situation call us to speak with a licensed clinician. We will conduct a free treatment assessment and insurance verification to help you determine the level of care that is right for you. Most major insurance companies now cover drug rehab, especially if you have a PPO plan.

We Offer a Drug Rehab that is Comprehensive

More often than not, addiction, drug abuse, and compulsive disorders, occurs in tandem with mental illnesses such as Depression or Anxiety. It is crucial that these complicating factors give shape to an intervention if it is to be successful. Clinically, the overlap between these different conditions can be difficult to identify, despite signs and markers that indicate their presence. In situations where an addict suffers from co-occurring disorders, they are referred to as being dual diagnosed. And one of ARC’s distinctions is how comprehensive its services are. This distinction is vitally important for both diagnostic reasons as well as determining what clinical protocols will be most effective once a client is in treatment.

Call to Learn More about our Los Angeles Drug Rehab

If you are interested in learning more about drug rehabilitation with Authentic Recovery Center call 1 877 415 4673 now. Our co-occurring disorders and addiction treatment approach is evidence-based and highly effective. With an extensive continuum of care, drug rehab can be initiated to address many different types of need. Remember, “The only failure in life is the failure to act”.



May 01 | 2014
60 Day Inpatient Rehab
60-day-treatment

60 Day Inpatient Rehab Program

ARC’s 60 day inpatient rehab program focuses on comprehensively diagnosing and treating the various factors that contribute to addiction. These operative factors are typically a combination of physiological features as well as psychological characteristics. Because substance abuse pathology is a complex web of competing traits and characteristics, to successfully address the myriad factors contributing to active abuse requires a cross-disciplined treatment team with experience administering to this niche population. Of necessity, treatment will focus on resolving what are referred to as primary features of the addiction, in addition to addressing symptoms of secondary mental health conditions, or what are known as co-occurring disorders.

The presence of co-occurring disorders (what is referred to as dual diagnosis) in addicted populations is significant, and is one of the reasons it is necessary to find a facility with staff and therapists who have experience successfully dealing with the complexities of this condition. In most cases, addiction does not occur in a vacuum as a free-standing condition, but presents with features of alternate disorders that become, over time, inextricably enmeshed with one another. For the addict, this translates into having to contend with all of the issues that accompany their addictive pathology, in addition to dealing with all of the features that attend other mental health disorders such as Depression or Anxiety. The psychological complexities dual diagnosed clients bring to the table demand clinical strategies and that are as nuanced and individualized as the people seeking help. ARC’s methodology is a combination of the most current, evidence-based techniques available, employed in conjunction with alternative treatment modalities, specifically designed to reach people who have previously been unsuccessful in other traditional treatment settings.

60 Day Inpatient Treatment Planning

ARC’s treatment plans, whether they are enrolled in 30, 60, or 90 days stays, are broken into different parts.

Unlike 30 day treatment plans, which by necessity require augmented service provisions that often have to be continued during the after care phase, one of the distinctive features of ARC’s 60 day inpatient rehab is its continuing commitment to treat the issues that have been uncovered during the first month of rehabilitation. Typically, whatever growth is achieved in the first 30 days – however significant – still must be measured against the neurological complications that arise from sustained addiction, and the ways in which these complications manifest over the course of treatment and continued sobriety.

Although these varieties of personality disturbances must be gauged and assessed with regards to the individual, complications often follow a fairly predictable course. With regards to treatment measures, this is exemplified by the fact that, from a purely physiological stand-point, every time a person ingests a narcotic, their brain releases Dopamine, a neurotransmitter, which in turn acts as a reward stimulus that reinforces the next use. Over time, with sustained abuse, this phenomenon physiologically alters the mesolimbic pathways and results in increasingly strong cravings. It is a statistical fact that the longer one stays in treatment the greater one’s chances of maintaining long-term recovery. Because of the personalized, intensive nature of ARC’s 60 day inpatient rehab programs, coupled with our aftercare services and alumni program, marked changes in a client’s personality are measurable after even 30 days of treatment.

Stages of 60 Day Inpatient Rehab

As stated, like 30 day treatment, 60 day inpatient rehab is broken down into three distinct phases, with each phase addressing the issues that have cumulatively arisen and encompass the entire spectrum addictive pathology. Based on this data, one of the key benefits of 60 day treatment over 30 day rehab is simply giving the brain additional time to adjust to being substance free (this process occurs, of course, against a backdrop of various clinical interventions that have, over a period of years, proven to be successful). Although most medical detoxes take roughly a week, the brain and body need more time to acclimate and stabilize to their sober status. Current research asserts that for most people, the brain takes roughly 90 days to fully resume some semblance of normal functionality. Because of these parameters, rehabilitation is best administered with a combination of traditional and non-traditional modalities of therapy, in addition to administering medications that alleviate symptoms arising from either the primary addictive pathology, or the symptoms that emerge from co-occurring disorders.

Part 1
Typically, during the first 30 days of rehab, issues are uncovered that often require a significant period of time to address and heal. As such, ubiquitous features that emerge at this juncture of treatment are balanced against the need to delve deeper into core issues, while ensuring that the client is ready and amenable to accept certain truths about their condition. Generally speaking, for most people that suffer from dual diagnosis, emotional and mental insights occur slowly, and are punctuated by moments of sporadic growth; hence the eloquent and simple equation – the longer one stays in rehab, the better their chances are of maintaining long-term stabilization, and taking their growth out into their larger lives. The 60 day treatment program provided at ARC accomplishes two goals. The first goal allows for the time and space necessary to physically, mentally, and emotionally stabilize; the second goal offers the one-on-one therapy, group therapy, as well as family and couples’ counseling necessary to nurture the healing process in the most comprehensive way possible.

Part 2
During the first 30 day of treatment, diagnostic and clinical measures can be hindered by the neuro-chemical dysfunction generated by sustained abuse. The sub acute and post acute withdrawal syndrome (also referred to as PAWS) that follows in the wake of the initial detox frequently cause lingering symptoms that are similar symptoms of Anxiety Disorders, Depressive Disorders, and other Mood Disorders. As people participate in individual therapy and group therapy, these symptoms tend to diminish. Unfortunately, misdiagnosing conditions is a common pitfall for traditional treatment professionals. And it is common for therapists and physicians to confuse the anxiety symptoms of post acute or sub acute withdrawal for symptoms of an actual Anxiety Disorder, which is why it is necessary to allot the time necessary to ensure that an accurate baseline be established from which diagnostic procedures can proceed.

Through continued observation, both individually and on a group level, our staff and therapists are able to distinguish between temporary symptomology and root psychiatric conditions. This is the fundamental purpose of the 60 day process: to engage the resources available to provide targeted clinical and medication-based interventions that reduce the underlying factors that are contributing to addictive pathology.

Part 3
The final Phase of ARC’s 60 day inpatient rehab program focuses on both continuing and enlarging the coping skills and strategies the client has been practicing over the course of their stay. By their nature, these issues tend to be transitional, and involve assisting the client to continue the work necessary to sustain their growth and recovery outside of a structured facility. During this stage of continuing care, issues tend to surface that reflect the enormity of the transition from residential treatment to sustained recovery without the immediate safety provided by the in-house setting. As these issues emerge, it is also common to reassess goals and establish new objectives that reflect the client’s changing needs as they move into the aftercare phase their recovery. This is an entirely natural development for clinical treatment. In cases where significant psychological or psychiatric issues require continuing attention, transition may take another few days or weeks to address. In cases where clinical and medical interventions have helped facilitate rapid progress, healing, and stabilization, the transition might already be a topic of discussion. Regardless, aftercare planning takes all of these factors into consideration to provide real-time recommendations for each person in order to ensure the highest chance of continued recovery.

Choosing the best drug rehab program in Los Angeles for yourself or a loved one can be a difficult prospect. Sometimes a supportive, knowledgeable voice can be the greatest help of all. If you would like to speak to a certified drug and alcohol counselor to ask questions or conduct a free assessment call 1 877 415 4673 now.



Apr 15 | 2014
30 Day Inpatient Rehab
30-day-inpatient-rehab

An Overview of the ARC 30 Day Inpatient Rehab

One of the distinguishing features of ARC’s 30 day drug inpatient rehab is its focus on comprehensively diagnosing and treating the foundational factors that contribute to addiction. Because the length of time is relatively short, ARC’s cross-disciplined staff and therapists utilize the 30 days of in-house treatment to suss out the primary, addictive pathology that motivates and gives shape to one’s condition. Invariably this includes detecting, diagnosing, and treating what are referred to as co-occurring disorders (what is also known as dual diagnosis – more below), which are secondary mental health disorders that have, over a period of time, complicated the primary addictive illness.

The presence of co-occurring disorders in addicted populations is significant, and ARC’s staff is trained to provide the care necessary to address these interlacing conditions. Our methodology is a combination of the most effective, evidence-based techniques available, in addition to alternative modalities of treatment, to help people who have previously been unsuccessful in other traditional treatment settings. This means that over the course of the client’s 30 days of residential care we assess, diagnose, and administer individualized treatment protocols that reveal the root causes of the individual’s addiction in order to create the most successful, personalized treatment program possible.

Stages of 30 Day Inpatient Rehab

The phases of ARC’s 30, 60, and 90 day programs consist of several components that remain fixed regardless the duration of time the addict remains in treatment. And, although each phase is in its own way autonomous from the phase preceding, they nonetheless run concurrently and guide the overall trajectory of treatment; with each phase specially tailored to meet the specific needs of the client wherever they are in their own particular recovery continuum. These phases include:

Every client who enters ARC is treated as an individual who brings to the table a specific set of issues and disorders that are unique to their physiology, mental health history, and family background. As such, personalized, clinical decisions regarding treatment plans are always employed in favor of therapeutic generalities. Care is taken during the primary assessment and intake, which continues throughout treatment, to calibrate services to meet the changing needs of each individual. This is fundamentally what separates ARC from other treatment centers: The insistence on gauging services according to the needs of the individual; and meeting the client where they’re at.

Phase One of 30 Day Inpatient Treatment
Detoxification is the foundation of recovery. This first step must include diagnostic criteria to address the entirety of the individual’s pathology, and the ways in which their addiction manifests in all areas of functioning. Once detox protocols are established, ARC’s staff focuses on addressing the root psychological issues that have taken shape along the entire spectrum of mismanagement and dysfunction. This process is both comprehensive and exhaustive. Professionals who work in the field of addiction have long noted that treating the physical symptoms of detoxification is relatively easy when compared to navigating the emotional and psychological issues that will arise over the course of the individual’s post-detox phase of treatment. Ironically, it is often the obstacles and crises that occur during the first several weeks of treatment that will become points of reference which the addict will turn to for guidance and aid later on in their recovery.

Phase Two of 30 Day Inpatient Treatment
During the second phase of treatment, ARC utilizes what are referred to as evidence-based tools to ensure that the individual’s clinical needs are met. This is a critical juncture in an addict’s early recovery, which is defined by continual transitions. It is usually a period of intense growth that often generates feelings of exhilaration and fear. The fear component is natural – in fact essential – because it indicates that the addict, willingly or unconsciously, is engaged in the process of challenging old belief systems and erecting a new self-image. Through both intensive individual therapy and rigorous group processing, destructive patterns of behavior are analyzed, and faulty modes of reacting are deconstructed.

One of ARC’s distinguishing features is the way it seamlessly incorporates and utilizes the social aspect of the community as a therapeutic tool where people can practice new communication skills and new coping strategies. By providing a supportive environment where they continually refine how to interact with their peers, residents are encouraged to practice socializing and having their needs met once they have left the security of the residential program.

Phase Three of 30 Day Inpatient Treatment
In their own way, aftercare services are as important as primary care services. This transitional phase inevitably challenges the addict, which is not necessarily a negative phenomenon. It is, rather, a moment of experiential insight that will enable the addict to identify issues that remained elusive while in residential treatment. When a client is preparing to leave treatment the nature of the support they receive can alter the entire trajectory of their recovery. It is imperative that the support provided be as clinical and therapeutic as it is communal and social. Individuals coming out of primary care are typically both fragile and frightened, without knowledge of how their new lives will take shape. Assisting them to continue their growth, minus the structure of inpatient care, is absolutely pivotal to long-term sobriety.

30 Day Treatment and Dual Diagnosis

Residential treatment centers generally last for 30 days. For clarification, dual diagnosis refers to a state in which an addict suffers from both their primary, addictive condition, in addition to another mental health disorder such as Depression or Anxiety. Long-term studies indicate that psychotherapy in conjunction with a medical detox are effective tools for managing addiction through all of the phases of treatment. At ARC, our clinical program and our treatment team is cross-disciplined to address the many facets of the addictive condition as it emerges in tandem with their secondary diagnosis. As stated previously, ARC’s primary, operative principle is to meet the client where they are at, and from there create a personalized treatment plan that will honor them as an individual and strive to do away with assumptions based upon conventional or standardized modes of clinical care. During and after the initial detox phase of treatment, a comprehensive plan is developed that successfully addresses the issues accompanying a dual diagnosis, which must work as one intervention, with each condition being thought of as part of a whole.

Social Model Rehab
Unique to ARC’s treatment strategies is utilizing the social aspects of inpatient rehab. Alcoholism is in part a disease of isolation. The addict isolates themselves, and also ends up isolating loved ones, friends, and family. The social component of addiction treatment is vitally important, without which treatment cannot occur. The group must be used to organically create an environment in which a chemically dependent person learns to express feelings, process emotions, successfully resolve conflicts, and essentially learn to develop and maintain healthy relationships that will be crucial to their long-term recovery. If successful, the social element of ARC’s addiction treatment will act as a map of sorts that the addict will unconsciously carry over into other aspects of their life.

Family Support
As with all diseases that are chronic and debilitating, addiction impacts virtually every aspect of life. Family Therapy support is provided with group therapy, couples counseling, and family therapy. This network of support encourages and supports loved ones to become a part of the addict’s recovery process, and in turn fosters their own growth. ARC’s staff, counselors, and therapists, represent the best and most advanced cross-disciplined team available. This is crucial for creating comprehensive, therapeutic strategies that will enable the addict to successfully navigate and resolve issues that previously left them baffled.

Multidisciplinary Approach
Clearly, no one therapeutic style is necessarily better than another, but instead must be regarded as parts of a whole; and effective treatment always requires a certain amount of latitude and flexibility with regards to clinical protocols. Some of the more common therapeutic styles employed by ARC’s therapists include:

Holistic and Advanced Methods
As stated, no one, single therapy provides a cure, and the most successful interventions combine different therapeutic styles in conjunction with various medications. This is where the need to utilize an integrated approach becomes necessary. At ARC, addiction treatment is distinguished by the comprehensive programs created by our multidimensional staff, which includes aftercare programs specifically tailored to the needs of each individual.

Call to Learn More about Authentic Recovery Center’s 30 Day Inpatient Rehab

This is by no means a comprehensive picture of the services the Authentic Recovery Center provides. Please visit the other sections of our website to better understand the full spectrum of addiction treatment options available to you or your loved one. Education is the most important tool available to you, and keeping current on latest treatment practices is the best way to ensure you or someone you love receives the care they need. If you would like to learn more about our dual diagnosis treatment services please call 1 877 415 4673 to speak with a counselor today.



Mar 01 | 2014
Free Treatment Los Angeles
Free Rehabilitation

The Authentic Recovery Center Does Not Offer Free Treatment

However, you may be in luck! With some of the recent changes to insurance, drug and alcohol treatment has become easier to approve and get covered by most PPO insurance plans. Fill out our free insurance verification form to find out if you are covered! If the person is physically or psychologically dependent on alcohol, drugs, or prescription medications then residential treatment is the proper course of action. Not every person requires the full spectrum of treatment offered at Authentic Recovery Center. Often, the individual won’t require that type of long-term support, which may take upwards of 4-6 months to complete continuing care. In this circumstance, you’re seeking a singular treatment episode, such as completion of a 30 day rehab. This short and singular approach is not always ill-advised and can actually be a very effective form of residential treatment. If the person has completed any form of outpatient rehab in the past and has been unable to maintain recovery then residential treatment is the next step to take.

Free Treatment Vs. Insurance Covered Rehab

Choosing from the many drug rehabs, alcohol rehabilitation programs, and dual diagnosis treatment centers in Los Angeles can seem a very difficult task. If you would like to speak with a counselor to explain your situation and learn more about your options for care, contact us. All calls are completely confidential and totally free. When you use the internet to find a drug rehab, most of the programs you’ll find are just advertisements for overpriced centers for the ultra elite. Even for seasoned professionals it can get pretty confusing.

When searching for free drug rehabs, free alcohol treatments, or dual diagnosis programs in Los Angeles, there are some important tips everyone should know in order to make the right decision. Keep in mind that there is a reason they are free, many of they offer a great service, but if you have health insurance it may cover rehab. The level of care you will get at a free program vs a paid or insurance covered rehab is immeasurable simply by design. For example many state run or free treatment programs cant afford to offer a medically managed detox and require a cold turkey detox, which can be very painful. In certain situations medical insurance may cover entirely, or at least offset, the cost of addiction and dual diagnosis treatment. Most PPO insurance plans offer coverage and benefits that include both behavioral and mental health services.

Ask the right questions. If you look above you’ll see a link titled, FAQ. Feel free to visit that to find a list of questions that are commonly asked before entering drug and alcohol treatment. Not knowing what questions to ask a treatment center in Los Angeles is normal, natural, and completely understandable. But take the time to learn which questions you should ask. If you take 15-30 minutes you could not only save yourself thousands of dollars, you will be able to choose the program that IS right, not just that sounds right.

Beware programs that promise results. Beware the cure, the guarantee, and any program that quotes a success rate. Really, this part is borderline criminal, but a lot of Los Angeles drug rehabs practice it. Despite what you want to believe, or what you wish to believe – no program can guarantee results. As soon as you see that, or hear that from a Los Angeles treatment center, walk away.

Find A Comprehensive Drug Rehab in Los Angeles

Don’t be afraid to ask for help finding a program. In some senses, choosing a drug or alcohol rehab facility is very difficult. There is no precise way to determine an appropriate length of stay in residential treatment prior to a formal assessment. However, for those that know the field, the landscape, and the approaches offered in Los Angeles treatment centers, the process of making the right decision is simple. That’s what Authentic Recovery Center is – a network of professionals who volunteer time to help people get the most effective treatment for their money, in programs that can support individually specific issues. Don’t try and do this all alone. Contact us today to speak with a certified counselor and learn more about the ARC and how we can help you or a loved one.

Free Drug Rehab Resources

There are multiple free drug rehabs and alcohol treatment centers located in Los Angeles, California. Although many people seeking a free drug rehab, alcohol treatment center, think that without financial resources there are no options, there are many free treatment programs that are low-cost, sponsored by donations, or that receive federal, county, or state funding. To learn more about how to locate these low-cost, county-funded, and free drug rehab options visit Free Treatment Los Angeles.



Feb 15 | 2014
Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms
acute-alcohol-withdrawal

Am I going through Alcohol Withdrawal?

We often hear people asking the questions: Am I going through Alcohol Withdrawals? How do I know if I am going through Alcohol Withdrawals? The only way to answer that question is to consult a doctor. Alcohol Withdrawal refers to a collection of withdrawal symptoms that emerge after a person has stopped drinking. Typically, this kind of symptomology indicates that the alcoholic has drunk for a long enough period of time to have damaged their Central Nervous System, their brain, and their liver. This sort of drinking leads to severe withdrawal and may need a medically managed detox.

Alcohol dependence is very dangerous and detoxing from Alcohol may require medical supervision to be conducted safely. If you are experiencing signs of alcoholism seek medical attention.

General Signs of Acute Alcohol Withdrawal

Typically, the discomfort and severity of one’s alcohol detox will be proportional to the nature of their drinking and in what quantities they consumed alcohol. Alcoholism of this variety, in which entrenched pathology is present, necessitates comprehensive treatment that takes into account the full spectrum of addictive pathology; in addition to implementing the most effective clinical protocols. In situations where a person has developed dependence to alcohol, measurable changes to the Central Nervous System will usually emerge, in addition to other personality disturbances.

Alcohol Withdrawal can emerge with either mild or severe symptoms and sets in approximately 5 to 10 hours after one’s last drink. In most cases, symptoms peak at around 60 hours, with acute symptomology largely disappearing after day 5.

Physical and Psychological Signs of Acute Withdrawal
During the acute phase, when the person is fully immersed in detoxification, the brain is actually engaged in a series of operations that are by-products of the detoxification process and as such considered to be aberrations. Symptoms that indicate a person is experiencing Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome include:

  • Shakiness, Tremors, Convulsions and/or Seizures
  • Chills, Sweating, Clammy and Pale Skin
  • Anxiety or Stress
  • Depression, Anger, Extremely volatile; Mood Swings.
  • Depersonalization, Confusion, Psychosis
  • Presence of Intermittent or Persistent Headaches.
  • Loss of Appetite, Weight Loss/Gain, Nausea/Vomiting
  • Sleep Disturbances, Restlessness, Fatigue.
  • Increased Blood Pressure, Rapid heart-rate.
  • Dilated Pupils, Sensitivity to Light
  • Death.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment that successfully addresses the issues accompanying a dual diagnosis patient must work as one intervention, with each condition being thought of as part of a whole. The first phase of any treatment plan, however, is detoxification (Dual Diagnosis essentially refers to a condition in which one’s alcohol addiction plays out in tandem with another mental health disorder).

Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment

Long-term studies indicate that psychotherapy in conjunction with a medical detox is effective tools for treating the withdrawal symptoms that occur during the acute phase. At ARC, our clinical program and our treatment team is cross-disciplined to address the many facets of the addictive condition. At ARC the primary, operative principle is to meet the client where they are at, and from there create a personalized treatment plan that will honor them as an individual and strive to do away with assumptions based upon conventional or standardized modes of clinical care.

Assessment
At ARC, a dual diagnosed client is carefully assessed by one of our physicians to determine the correct course of action to rid the person of their physical dependence to liquor. During and after this initial phase a comprehensive treatment plan is developed, taking into consideration all of the factors that contribute to a client’s mental health status, including family history and medical history, in addition to all relevant psychological factors. As such, treatment at ARC includes individual and group counseling, attending 12 Step meetings and working a 12 Step program, psychotherapy, as well as education and supplemental, alternative therapies such as nutrition and exercise.

Social Model Treatment
Unique to ARC’s treatment strategies is utilizing the social aspects of the residential inpatient treatment. Alcoholism is in part a disease of isolation. The addict isolates themselves, and also ends up isolating loved ones, friends, and family. The social component of addiction treatment is vitally important, without which treatment cannot occur. The group must be used to organically create an environment in which a chemically dependent person learns to express feelings, process emotions, successfully resolve conflicts, and essentially learn to develop and maintain healthy relationships that will be crucial to their long-term recovery. If successful, the social element of ARC addiction treatment will act as a map of sorts that the client will unconsciously carry over into other aspects of their life.

Family Support
Treatment for acute alcohol withdrawal also must take into consideration the family component. At ARC, we offer a family support program. Family support is provided with group therapy, couples counseling, and family therapy. This network of support encourages and supports loved ones to become a part of the client’s process of recovery, and in turn fosters their own growth.

Advanced Holistic Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment

As with all diseases that are chronic and debilitating, alcoholism impacts virtually every aspect of the alcoholic’s life. ARC’s staff, counselors, and therapists, represent the best and most advanced cross-disciplined team available. This is crucial for creating comprehensive, therapeutic strategies that will address all of the facets treatment. No one therapeutic style is necessarily better than another, but instead must be regarded as parts of a whole; and effective treatment always requires a certain amount of latitude and flexibility with regards to clinical protocols.

It should be noted that no one single therapy provides a cure, and that the most successful interventions combine different therapeutic styles in conjunction with various medications. This is where the need to utilize an integrated approach becomes necessary. At ARC, alcohol withdrawal treatment is distinguished by the comprehensive programs created by our multi-dimensional staff, which includes aftercare programs specifically tailored to the needs of each individual.



Feb 01 | 2014
Signs of Drug Withdrawal
signs-of-drig-withdrawal

Examining Different Aspects of Drug Withdrawal

Drug withdrawal refers to a set of symptoms that occur as a result of cessation from a drug or medication that one has habitually used for a prolonged period of time, which sometimes require a medically managed detox. The symptoms of withdrawal are as varied as the substances that produce their effects. One can experience withdrawal symptoms from Stimulants such as Methamphetamines, from Sedatives such as Valium, long lasting tranquilizers such as Barbiturates, in addition to Opiates such as Heroin. These symptoms can persist throughout the numerous stages of treatment, past detox into Residential Treatment, and sometimes into Continuing Care if the individuals usage was severe enough.

The development of drug withdrawal symptoms are exclusively precipitated by dependence, which in turn necessitates habituated use, and usually occurs in tandem with addictive pathology. For the sake of clarity, addictive pathology can be regarded as an umbrella term – a shorthand – that covers a wide range of behaviors, disorders, and personality traits, which, taken together, indicate the presence of addiction. In cases where addiction is present, there is a constellation of characteristics that, broadly speaking, give shape to the treatment measures best suited to the individual, and orient the trajectory of the protocols that will be employed to help them get clean. At ARC, each client is treated as an individual, and as such given the dignity of a personalized assessment that strives to avoid assumptions with regards to their care. For the person looking to get clean or a loved one attempting to help a spouse, son, daughter, etc, acquire help, this is of the utmost importance.

Drug Withdrawal Follows A Predictable Path

For example, Heroin withdrawal follows a predictable course and manifests with a predicable set of symptoms which last for a specific set of time that occur regardless of one’s personality traits or psychological characteristics. As such, detoxing someone from Heroin requires certain steps that are as universal as the symptoms themselves; as such detox can be successfully achieved with the assistance of assumptions that usually pertain to the physical aspects of the detox process. It should be noted, however, that even symptoms as predictable as Heroin, it is nonetheless necessary to take into account emotional and psychological considerations that are unique to the individual, without which comprehensive treatment is impossible.

This holds true for Stimulants and Sedatives alike. Each substance, medication, or drug, manifests common features that will occur at stages regardless of the personality traits each person brings to the table. There are also scenarios that, by their very nature, require scrutiny in a way that honors them as unique beings requiring a unique set of interventions. This is especially true where a person has become dependent on a drug but demonstrates little or none of the Addictive pathology that typifies the Addictive cycle.

Severity of Drug Withdrawal Symptoms
Symptomatically (in addition to the variety of drug being abused), the severity of the withdrawal symptoms is proportional to the quantity and duration of abuse. A long-term Methadone habit will be significantly more uncomfortable than a two month Vicodin habit, although symptomatically there will also be similarities. And, in the same way Addiction occurs in stages, withdrawal progresses through clearly defined stages, as does the entire treatment process.

Physical Symptoms of Drug Withdrawal
Withdrawal symptoms can manifest as both physical and psychological symptoms, which are caused by physiological adaptions in the central nervous system and the brain due to chronic exposure to a specific substance. The following list is not comprehensive but should give you an idea of some of the more common physical symptoms that indicate the presence of withdrawal. These include:

  • Increased heart rate and/or blood pressure
  • Sweating, chills, runny nose and fever
  • Body aches, pains, and cramps
  • Hallucinations, seizures, confusion
  • Nausea and vomiting, decreased appetite
  • Insomnia, restlessness
  • Anxiety, nervousness, increased stress
  • Volatile mood swings, suicidal thoughts, extended periods of depression

Med Compliance Dependency and Withdrawal
There are situations in which a person becomes unwittingly dependent on a medication that is obtained legally and prescribed by a physician. This particular scenario presents certain complications with regards to treatment protocols, not the least being that they otherwise manifest none of the drug seeking behaviors and dual diagnosis illnesses that are present in most addicts. This particular variety of Addict is usually baffled, terrified, and resistant to the idea that they are in the same situation as a Heroin addict who has spent years running the street and engaging in anti-social behaviors. There are scenarios in which a person becomes addicted to a Sedative – Valium, for instance – without demonstrating the behaviors that typify addictive pathology. In situations of this kind, detox protocols must be tailored to the individual, despite the fact that this is the stage of recovery where assumptions can be safely made because of the commonality of physical withdrawal symptoms.

The Essence of Drug Withdrawal Treatment

Unfortunately, treatment has become an industry; primarily concerned with the bottom line as opposed to the well-being of the client. Efficiency has become so pervasive that the integrity of the treatment process has degenerated proportionally to the quality of care that is available. Today, more often than not, the treatment process is preoccupied with streamlining its protocols and operating under generalized assumptions that have less to do with ensuring the client receives dignified, personalized care, as it does maintaining census. With regards to the medical component of treatment, addiction is not the same as, say, high cholesterol, where treatment measures are standardized and adhere to a set of interventions that apply effectively to both elderly Caucasians as well as young African Americans. Addiction is so complex with regards to its pathology that to make overly broad assumptions actually hinders the addict’s progress towards recovery. ARC’s treatment team and staff is distinguished by the manner in which it approaches the person seeking help. And, although there are elements and features of addiction that occur on a continuum of dysfunction – regardless of race, ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic factors – the bane of effective treatment is relying on presumptions that effectively evades the nuances of the person as well as their specific needs.



Jan 15 | 2014
Medical Detox

medical-detoxification-los-angeles-detox-center
If you are in need of medically-managed detoxification services from alcohol, drugs, or prescription medications, contact us now or seek medical attention immediately.

Medical Detox Los Angeles: Two Methods of Treatment

The Authentic Recovery Center provides medically-managed residential detoxification services in Los Angeles, California. If you would like to learn more about our private detox center please call us! While some Los Angeles rehab centers do not offer any type of medical detox, we offer a medically-managed residential detoxification program. This means that each client is assigned medical doctor while at our detox center. This approach allows our clients to not only receive the best individualized care available but to also undergo drug detoxification or detox from alcohol in the safest and most comfortable way possible. This section of the website outlines why our medically-managed residential detox center is effective and safe.

  1. Medically-Managed Detoxification vs. Non Medical Detox
  2. An Overview of the ARC Medically-Managed Detoxification Program
  3. The Types of Treatment Available to Prevent Relapse After Leaving ARC Detox Center Los Angeles

There are essentially two divergent approaches to used by detox centers. These are:

  • Medically-Managed Detoxification
  • Non Medical Detoxification

Medically-Managed Detoxification
In the medical detox center model each person who is dependent on habit-forming drugs is assessed by a doctor who specializes in addiction medicine. This doctor will utilize specific medications to ease withdrawal symptoms and plays a critical role in developing a safe and effective treatment plan for their medical detox. The idea behind the medically-managed detoxification protocol is to find the balance between keeping a client comfortable during the withdrawal process and preventing them from becoming dependent on the medications assigned to address their withdrawal symptoms. During the stay in a detox center (which varies in length) the independent doctor constantly makes adjustments as needed to either increase, decrease, or adjust the protocol in order to complete the drug detox or detox from alcohol as fast and as safely as possible. The medically-managed model is known for being highly personalized and specifically designed to address the unique nature of each persons addiction and dependency problem.

Non Medical Detoxification
In a non medical detox center the person is not assessed by a doctor or provided with any medications to ease withdrawal symptoms. The protocol in the non medical approach is to simply observe the client while they withdraw. The philosophy behind this technique is to promote a sense of emotional and physical discomfort in order to, “…increase the patients desire to stay away from drugs.” This is widely considered by most health care professionals as a “last resort” to supporting people who are physically dependent on alcohol, drugs, or prescription medications, primarily because of the inherent dangers related to unassisted withdrawal. However, if a person is not dependent on alcohol, drugs, or prescription medication, the non medical detox method may be considered as a treatment option.

Overview Of Detox Centers in Los Angeles

The Authentic Recovery Center offers a medically-managed detoxification program.We have found that the medically assisted model is the safest and most effective protocol for the majority of the population we serve. If you would like to learn more about how to enroll with us now. Below you will find an in-depth view of ARC’s Detox Center Los Angeles protocol, and how these initial interventions give shape to the client’s overall, and ever changing treatment program. Discussion will touch on key aspects of ARC’s guiding philosophy, in addition to some of the procedures typically employed at this critical juncture.

Importance of Entering a Detox Center

Why is Detox Important?
Invariably, for the various clinical tools employed by ARC to be effective, it is absolutely vital for one’s head and body to first be defogged. This first step towards recovery is extremely important, and in the same way that later treatment needs to reflect the nuances of each individual, detoxification must also honor the specifics of the client’s physical condition. No two detoxes are exactly alike, in the same way that no two clients have exactly same needs. Often the shape of one’s early recovery will be shaped and formed at this critical juncture.

Because ARC considers this initial phase to be inextricably bound up with the addict’s future recovery, rather than an ugly necessity to be overcome and quickly forgotten, both during and following detoxification, ongoing assessments are made that will determine the best possible course of future treatment to meet the needs of the client.

Unique to ARC’s treatment strategies is utilizing the social aspects of the residential setting. Addiction is in part a disease of isolation. The addict isolates themselves, and also ends up isolating loved ones, friends, and family. The social component of addiction treatment is vitally important, without which treatment cannot occur. The group must be used to organically create an environment in which a chemically dependent person learns to express feelings, process emotions, successfully resolve conflicts, and essentially develop and maintain healthy relationships that will be crucial to their long-term recovery. If successful, the social element of ARC Addiction treatment will act as a map of sorts that the Addict will unconsciously carry over into other aspects of their life.

Every Detox is Unique
Typically, the course of one’s medical detox will also be informed by what kinds of substances they have been abusing. Cocaine withdrawal is very different from heroin withdrawal, and, as stated previously, treatment measures will thus depend on what substances an individual has abused. Some drugs are easier to detoxify from than others, and produce little or no uncomfortable side-effects. For example, cocaine is typically easy to detox from because of the absence of intense physical withdrawal symptoms (there are, however, very intense psychological cravings that attend cocaine detoxification, but with proper attention can be harnessed and used later to assist the addict staying clean).

Heroin (or any other Opiate) on the other hand, produces intensely uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms that range from moderate to severe, and necessitate oversight by a physician trained in addiction medicine. In most cases the withdrawal symptoms that accompany opiate detoxification are so severe that without a medical detox, an individual’s chances of achieving long-term sobriety are minimal. Other detoxes, such as detoxification from alcohol, absolutely require the supervision of a medical doctor, without which in rare cases can be fatal.

ARC Medical Detox Center Los Angeles
The Authentic Recovery Center offers a comprehensive treatment program and medical detox center which is based in Los Angeles, California. Our facility offers multiple treatment options designed to meet the needs of every individual seeking help. These programs essentially are three-way clinical models that are broken down into pieces, each of which employ increasingly nuanced therapeutic styles to encourage addicts to better understand themselves, their recovery and their addiction. Practically speaking the program is broken down into different levels of care, all of which are supplemented with family counseling and couples’ counseling, individualized treatment programs, and assorted aftercare services. Aftercare services include day or night care, extended care and aftercare, and participation in ARC’s alumni program.

Regardless of the duration of each stay, the focus is on discovering the foundational causes of addiction, while simultaneously stressing the importance of translating these discoveries into practical action that fosters long-term recovery. To be clear, detoxification refers to the process by which the body rids itself of the toxins which accumulate through prolonged addiction or exposure to a given substance. It is an axiom that no recovery can be achieved without going through this first step, and frequently the entire trajectory of one’s recovery will be impacted or shaped by this experience. Because the individual in detox is typically in such a fragile state, it is imperative that one’s detox reflect the larger goals of treatment, the attainment of which requires cross-disciplined specialists working in tandem to provide comprehensive care.

Stages of Rehabilitation and Support
As previously stated, treatment at ARC is broken down into parts. We the primary being medical detox from alcohol or drugs. Because most addicts and alcoholics enter treatment at some point in their drinking or using in which crisis has set in, more often than not their addiction has advanced far enough that some form of medical detox is necessary for treatment measures to be affective. Detoxification is not a one-size-fits-all proposition, but is shaped by both the personality nuances of the individual trying to get clean, as it is the variety of substances they have been using and for how long. Just as detox centers are not one size fit all, we specialize in Dual Diagnosis individuals and the complexity that accompanies such maladies.

Detox is Necessary for Accurate Clinical Evaluation
The medically-managed detoxification component of ARC’s addiction treatment also helps to address other mental health issues that may be contributing to an individual’s condition. Often time’s clients suffer from what are called co-occurring disorders, for example Depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or some form of Anxiety Disorder. When co-occurring disorders are present, the client is said to be dual diagnosed. Without comprehensive medical detoxification services accurately assessing the individual for these co-occurring issues is all but impossible. However, once detox is complete, and neurochemistry is somewhat stabilized, a comprehensive work-up can begin to determine whether these types of factors are contributing to addictive pathology. This information is critical in order to develop a treatment plan that will be effective in supporting each individual in their ongoing recovery.

Medically-Managed Detox And Dual Diagnosis
At ARC, a dual diagnosed client is carefully assessed by one of our independent physicians to determine the correct course of action to rid the person of their physical dependence to their drug of choice. During and after this initial phase a comprehensive treatment plan is developed, taking into consideration all of the factors that contribute to a client’s mental health status, including family history and medical history, in addition to all relevant psychological factors.

Personalized Treatment Planning
At ARC, the primary operative principle is to meet the client where they are at, and from there create a personalized treatment plan that will honor them as an individual and strive to do away with assumptions based upon conventional or standardized modes of clinical care. Detoxification that successfully addresses the issues accompanying a dual diagnosis must work as one intervention, with each condition being thought of as part of a whole.

Clinical Services
Treatment following detoxification at ARC’s Detox Center is multi-faceted. As stated before, addiction and dual diagnosis is a complex set of issues that requires multiple tactics to successfully treat. Treatment at ARC includes individual and group counseling, attending 12 Step meetings and working a 12 Step program, psychotherapy, family & couple’s counseling, as well as education and supplemental, alternative therapies such as nutrition and exercise.

Family Support and Treatment Tools
Treatment for addiction also must take into consideration the family component. As stated, at ARC, family support is provided with group therapy, couples counseling, and family therapy. This network of support encourages and supports loved ones to become a part of the Addict’s process of recovery, and in turn fosters their own growth. As with all diseases that are chronic and debilitating, Addiction takes a toll on families, and requires both treatment of its own kind, in addition to education, to be fully comprehensive.

Types of Treatment Available to Prevent Relapse After leaving A Detox Center
Ultimately, detoxification is simply the first step towards a successful recovery. After detox is complete and abstinence has been established people often find themselves unequipped to deal with life newly clean and sober. Without ongoing clinical support the chances of relapse shortly after detox are significantly higher based on this fact.

Fortunately, the Authentic Recovery Center offers multiple aftercare programs that complement our drug and alcohol detox services and are designed specifically to help people during this early critical period in recovery. This section of the website outlines a few of the continuing treatment options that are outfitted to help people once they complete detox treatment.

Option 1 – Ongoing Residential Treatment
At any point during medical detox an individual may choose to stay in residential treatment and complete primary care. This is not always possible due to prior obligations or present responsibilities, but if that is not the case, further treatment is always a valuable consideration.

Option 2 – Intensive Outpatient
If continuing residential treatment is logistically impossible, attending Day Rehab is a great option for ongoing support. This program is non-residential and runs 5 days per week. The clinical services and peer support are a great resource for people that have exhibited patterns of relapse in the past.

Call to Learn More about the Authentic Recovery Center Medical Detox Los Angeles Today
If you or someone you love is in need of medical detoxification services call 1 877 415 4673 now. The Authentic Recovery Center is one of only a few treatment centers in Los Angeles that offer medically-managed detoxification program as a stand alone resource. As previously mentioned, our drug treatment approaches also include multiple levels of care that complement the detox component of addiction treatment. Remember, “The only failure in life is the failure to act”.

Authentic Recovery Center | Licensed Detox Center Los Angeles, California.

“ARC offers the best medically-managed residential detoxification program in Los Angeles.
Mary Ann – Beverly Hills, California



Dec 15 | 2013
Alcohol Tolerance
alcohol-tolerance

Alcohol Tolerance

Alcohol Tolerance refers to the body’s response to prolonged exposure to liquor; its ability to both metabolize liquor, as well as its ability to rebound from its effects. Tolerance as a physical phenomenon increases incrementally as consumption of liquor continues over a period of years. What emerges along with the increasing Tolerance is the phenomenon of Dependence, whereby the body simultaneously requires larger and larger quantities of liquor to achieve the desired effect. Typically, Tolerance leads to Dependence, and the two traits manifest in such a way that it is futile to address one without addressing the other. Dependence generally requires medically managed detox to alleviate initial withdrawal symptoms.

Physiologically, as a result of chronic drinking, the body endures damage to a large number of organs and organ systems, first amongst them being damage to the liver. Ironically, there is a ceiling effect with regards to Tolerance, which means that after a long enough duration of abuse, the body’s ability to metabolize the liquor (specifically, the liver), diminishes to the point where a phenomenon known as Reverse Tolerance take shape. Reverse Tolerance occurs when the liver’s ability to process the liquor has become so impaired that small amounts lead to major toxicity and soaring Blood Alcohol Concentration (also referred to as BAC).

How Alcohol Tolerance Effects The Body.

Typically, the average temperate drinker can metabolize approximately 6oz of liquor in an hour. However, with people who chronically abuse alcohol, the liver (at least initially), learns to metabolize larger amounts more efficiently. The liver handles this load by producing excessive enzymes which allow it to absorb the alcohol in such concentration. It is this process whereby the liver develops the Tolerance, which is the fingerprint of any Addictive condition.

In addition to the liver, the brain also plays a part in the emergence of Tolerance. This occurs because the brain works to suppress the production of specific neurotransmitters known as GABA receptors, which are responsible for generating Sedation and sleep. Most Sedatives, including Benzodiazepines, work on these specific transmitters. In the wake of repeated dosing, a tranquilizing, sedating effect sets in, which expresses itself as the reduction of alertness and anxiety. Like liquor, Sedatives such as Valium and Xanax has very similar effects on the body with regards to withdrawal and inebriation.

Alcohol, as such, is a Central Nervous System Depressant, which is why its first effects are the alleviation of stress. As the person drinking continues to consume liquor either continuously or in larger and larger amounts, key signs emerge that Dependence and Tolerance are manifesting themselves. The most acute symptoms fade relatively quickly, however the more subtle symptoms such as restlessness and insomnia may persist throughout many stages of residential treatment and after care long after abstaining from alcohol. Some of the features of dependence include:

  • Impaired memory, confusion, reduction in attention span.
  • Impaired motor functioning, and coordination, slurred speech.
  • Euphoria or a sense of well-being.
  • Being overly talkative or overly animated.
  • Insomnia.

Tolerance also depends on the physical size of the person drinking. Large individuals who weigh more are able to metabolize larger quantities of liquor than small individuals who weigh less. How this manifests is larger people naturally enjoy a higher Tolerance for liquor than smaller people, while demonstrating less obvious signs of intoxication. The enzyme responsible for breaking down Liquor is called alcohol dehydrogenases, which is a chemical that resides in the liver. The equation for exposing the presence of Alcoholism breaks down quite eloquently: Generally, the extent to which this particular enzyme is present is proportional to the liver’s toxicity.

Types of Alcohol Tolerance

To date, there exist several different types of Tolerance, and it is worth taking a moment to establish what they are and how they differ from one another. The types of Tolerance are:

  • Acute Tolerance – typically Tolerance sets in over a period of time and over more than one drinking session; which essentially means that alcohol inebriation is actually greater when quantified earlier than later in one’s drinking session. As for the drinker, this usually means they will end up consuming larger amounts than they would need to consume otherwise.
  • Environment-Dependent Tolerance – This refers to a geographical habituation, where being in the presence of familiar people in familiar locations actually helps to increase one’s Tolerance. Although this phenomenon is not entirely understood, it nonetheless manifests in heavy drinkers and Alcoholics and can even be observed in social drinkers.
  • Learned Tolerance – Tolerance can also develop in tandem with a specific set of rituals or task oriented activities. This phenomenon is referred to as Behaviorally Augmented Tolerance. One of the ways this manifests is with, say, a musician, who learned and mastered their instrument while either drinking or being under the influence of some drug or medication. It is not unusual for people in this predicament to undergo a period of literally re-learning their trade, craft, or art, in the absence of their desired medication. There has also been observed with this process a reward-pattern at work, where there exists, along with the liquor consumption, the expectation that a powerful state of emotional reward will emerge in drinking’s wake. Ironically, this variation of Tolerance does not spill over into activities where motor functioning is critical, which is why it is never safe for a person to drive while under the influence, despite their Tolerance to consume large quantities of alcohol (or any other substance).
  • Environment-Independent Tolerance – There have been recorded instances where functional Tolerance emerges, even after consumption of large quantities of liquor, which exist independent of environmental influences.
  • Metabolic Tolerance – This particular expression of Tolerance brings us full-circle, because it refers to a manifestation of Tolerance that was touched upon at the beginning of this article. When the body is able to eliminate alcohol from its system in an expedited fashion, one has achieved what is known as Metabolic Tolerance; whereby consistent, prolonged exposure to liquor initially enables the person to drink considerably more liquor than their weight, size, and mass would otherwise allow.


Dec 01 | 2013
Post Acute Withdrawal Symptoms
post-acute-withdrawal-symptoms

Post Acute Withdrawal Symptoms

Simply put, Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (also known as PAWS) refers to a set of traits and impairments that occur following cessation of some drug or medication. They differ from acute withdrawal symptoms in that they follow in the wake of detoxification and often linger for indeterminate periods of time. It is not uncommon for these traits to plague an individual for months and in some cases even years after treatment has ended. They tend to be associated with long-term abuse of alcohol, Benzodiazepines, and Opiates, and are less common amongst people who abuse Stimulants such as Crack or Cocaine.

Benzodiazepines are a Common Cause

This set of symptoms is especially pronounced in people withdrawing from Benzodiazepines. In cases where someone is coming off a sedative such as Xanax or Valium, symptoms can disturb overall functioning for years after the final dose, which is why a long-range treatment plan needs to be implemented that will take into account the entire trajectory of one’s treatment and recovery.

Origin of Effect

Although the exact mechanism is not entirely understood, it is believed that the post acute phase is at least in part due to various physiological adaptations that have occurred in the Central Nervous System over an extended period of exposure to one or more drugs or medications. Indicators include the development of tolerance and the presence of dependence, and manifest as a result of the brain’s inability to successfully cope to stressful situations.

Symptoms of PAWS

Typically, symptoms pf PAWS fluctuate, with their intensity endlessly gaining and ebbing, and causing a highly disturbing cycle that frequently leads ro relapse.
The most common symptoms include:

  • Impaired cognition.
  • Irritability
  • Depressed mood
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Palpitations

Additional Signs of PAWS

As stated before, not all substances generate post acute symptomology. These features tend to be more common amongst alcoholics, people who abuse Sedatives or Tranquilizers, or people who abuse Narcotics. With regard to Sedatives, the protracted withdrawal syndrome generated from Benzodiazepines creates symptoms that are virtually identical to those of an Anxiety Disorder. This includes racing thoughts, chills, tremors, and seizures. In addition to the traits already mentioned, the following list of symptoms are also related to the post acute phase. These include:

  • Anhedonia (an inability to experience joy).
  • Depression.
  • Behaviors associated with OCD.
  • Difficulty focusing.
  • Disturbances in autonomic functioning.
  • Lapses in memory.
  • Hyper arousal with regards to stressful situations.
  • Agitation.
  • Motor dysfunction

Treatment Considerations

With regards to how post acute withdrawal symptoms manifest, their course is always shaped by the kind of drug the person has abused. Post acute withdrawal from Heroin generates a set of side-effects that is fairly predictable, in addition to being very different from the post acute symptoms brought on by Stimulants. Because of the complex way in which a person’s body responds to abstinence (usually further complicated by additional and co-occurring mental health disorders – more below), and because of the duration of these particular symptoms, detoxification necessitates oversight by a physician with a background in addiction medicine, which is co-administered by an experienced team of cross disciplined mental health professionals who are experienced addressing the needs of this specific population.

Drugs that may Result in Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome

The following is a list of some of the more commonly abused drugs available that can generate Post Acute Withdrawal Syndrome. These drugs include:

  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Hallucinogens
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Opiates
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Inhalants
  • Methamphetamine
  • Nicotine


Nov 15 | 2013
Psychological Dependency
psychological-dependence

Psychological Dependency

According to the APA, Psychological Dependence refers to a mental a cycle where one is “dependent on a psychoactive substance for the reinforcement it provides”. To the lay person, what this signifies is that the physiological response to the medication or drug precipitates and simultaneously reinforces its continued abuse. For reasons of diagnostic criteria, this generally falls under the heading addiction, and are typically indivisible as phenomenon whereby craving is generated. The term with regards to addiction refers to a particular substance that the addict abuses compulsively because of the enjoyable mental affects it generates.

Causes of Condition

Typically, people become dependent on something because its ingestion becomes associated with alleviation of mental duress. This mental duress can manifest as Depression, Anxiety, or a host of other uncomfortable emotional states, but it is the cessation of discomfort that reinforces and creates the Psychological Dependence, as opposed to the physical dependence manifesting as a result of the emotional relief. As with other forms of addiction, each successive use tends to reinforce the next, and where physiological addiction is present, the affect is that much more amplified.

Spectrum of Term Usage

With regards to addiction per se, the term is actually falling out favor because Psychological Dependence is now associated with a number of compulsive behaviors that are not necessarily defined by abuse of a medication or drug. Psychological Dependence now refers to gambling disorders, sexually compulsive disorders, in addition to eating disorders and even internet pornography. This is in part due to the inexact and vague nature of the term itself. The fact that the term is so elastic – that it covers such a broad range of behaviors that as often as not have nothing to do with addiction to a substance – but rather a lifestyle has given rise to the use of the term dependence instead.

Symptoms of Addiction

Additionally, as researchers learn more about addiction as a medical condition, the term Psychological Dependence has also lost footing. Today, Addiction is viewed as a complex interplay between psychological and emotional factors, in addition to physiological traits and genetic predispositions.
Generally speaking, features of Addiction include:

  • Preoccupation with alcohol and drugs.
  • Inability to control one’s drinking or using.
  • Increased tolerance to alcohol or drugs.
  • The presence of Dependence, which typically manifests with withdrawal symptoms.
  • Continued Abuse, despite increasingly severe and negative consequences.
  • Distortions in thinking, usually demonstrated by what is referred to as Denial.

Comprehensive Treatment

With the exception of the last entry – denial – addiction specialists more and more have come to regard the process of addiction as being a process that occurs on a physiological level, with the psychological traits taking shape after the physical tendencies have taken form. At ARC, addiction is treated comprehensively, which means that both the emotional factors and underlying physiology is simultaneously treated as parts of the whole; where the division between the Physiological Addiction and Psychological Addiction, at least with regards to treatment protocols, is largely false. Suffice to say by the time a person is in need of residential or outpatient treatment; Chemical Dependency has progressed into something far more overreaching than merely a set of maladaptive, abusive behaviors and tendencies. Detoxification is rarely enough, and in order for the Dependent person to truly surmount their own pathological pitfalls and enjoy a life of recovery they must be willing to confront and deconstruct a series of personality traits, assumptions, and belief systems that are intertwined with their active Dependency.

Drugs with Abuse Potential

The following list is by no means comprehensive, and there is available a multitude of drugs not on this list that nonetheless have enormous Abuse potential (it should be noted that, as such, each of the following substances listed occurs with its own set of psychological characteristics; each of which require specialized attention to adequately address). However, for the sake of expediency, the following substances are the most frequently abused and include:

  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Hallucinogens
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Opiates
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Inhalants
  • Methamphetamine
  • Nicotine


Nov 01 | 2013
90 Day Inpatient Rehab
90-day-treatment

Overview of the ARC 90 Day Treatment Program

The Authentic Recovery Center offers an inpatient 90 day inpatient rehab based in Los Angeles, California. The facility offers comprehensive treatment options designed to meet the needs of every individual seeking help. Our programs essentially are three-way clinical models that are broken down into three phases, each of which employ increasingly nuanced therapeutic modalities to encourage addicts to better understand themselves, their recovery, and their addiction. Practically speaking the programs are broken down into 30, 60, and 90 day stays, all of which are supplemented with family counseling, couples’ counseling, individualized treatment programs, and assorted aftercare services. Aftercare services include day or night care, extended care and aftercare, and participation in ARC’s alumni program. Regardless the duration of each stay, the focus is on discovering the foundational causes of addiction, while simultaneously stressing the importance of translating these discoveries into practical action that fosters long-term recovery.

90 Days of Rehab and Treatment

To date, current research indicates that 90 days is the necessary period of time one should spend in residential treatment to foster long-term recovery. It should be noted that this is not a claim made by ARC with regards to our own success record or statistics, but is a proposition backed-up by a number of clinical, empirically based studies (both government and academic), all of which assert that physiologically the body and brain generally takes approximately 3 months to resume baseline functioning. The data goes on to assert that the neurological damage produced by consistent abuse manifests as the brain’s inability to regulate production of Serotonin and Dopamine; both of which are neurotransmitters associated with the pleasure center and reward circuitry in the brain.

Success Outcomes and Research

According to a NIDA (National Institute of Drug Abuse) research monograph conducted in 2003, individuals who complete 90 consecutive days of residential treatment are 35% more likely to maintain 5 years of unbroken recovery then people who do not complete a 90 day inpatient rehab. To be clear, treatment protocols need to be as nuanced and individualized as the people seeking help; and that working from statistical generalities is a dangerous course to take with regards to creating effective interventions that honor the needs of the individual. From an operational standpoint, what is effective for one person does not necessarily help another. Having stated this, there also exist predicable features of addictive pathology with regards to both detoxification and clinical interventions that manifest across the entire spectrum of abuse and recovery, regardless of age, ethnicity, or the kind of substances the person has been abusing.

Phases of Care

ARC’s methodology and treatment services are a combination of the most current, evidence-based techniques available, in addition to traditional therapeutic modalities and non-traditional modalities, both of which are designed and employed with an eye to reaching people who have previously been unsuccessful in other treatment settings. In practice, ARC’s 90 day program is broken down into 3 Phases, in much the same way as 30 or 60 day stays. The 3 phases include:

  • Phase 1 – Medically Managed Detoxification Services
  • Phase 2 – Primary Care Treatment
  • Phase 3 – Aftercare and Extended Care

Comprehensive Assessment

Treatment at ARC commences with comprehensively assessing the addict and establishing personalized, diagnostic criteria, which enables our treatment team to create­ individualized treatment protocols that uncover the root causes of the person’s addiction, while creating a nurturing and safe environment in which the individual has the best possible chances for recovering.

Dual Diagnosis Services

Of necessity, one of the distinctive features of ARC’s 90 day program is its continuing commitment to treat the psychological issues that have been uncovered during the first 2 months of rehabilitation. The growth that is achieved in the first 30 and 60 days must be measured against the neurological complications that have emerged as a result of sustained addiction or prolonged exposure to a medication or drug. Bearing in mind the conclusions of the long-term studies cited, one of the key benefits of ARC’s 90 day treatment program is that the brain is given the time necessary to adjust to being substance free and settle into a baseline functioning from which further clinical tools can be applied.

Detoxification

Typically, most medically-managed detoxes take roughly a week, although there are circumstances in which acute withdrawal symptoms can last significantly longer. Be that as it may, the brain and body require considerably more time to acclimate and stabilize than is provided by the detox phase. This situation is complicated by the presence of what is referred to as post acute withdrawal syndrome (also referred to as PAWS), in addition to the presence of what are referred to as co-occurring disorders (for clarity, a person who manifests co-occurring disorders – who suffers from both addiction and another mental health disorder – is known as dual diagnosed. More below), which manifests as a set of lingering symptoms that can plague the addict for weeks or months, and in extreme cases (for example, cases where a person has been abusing a class of medication called Benzodiazepines, which include Valium and Xanax), the post acute symptoms can remain active for upwards of a year. This physiological damage cuts across ethnic boundaries and socioeconomic status, and is present in individuals regardless of age or sex. For treatment to be successful, this feature must be addressed with therapy, medication, or a combination of both.

Objectives of Treatment

One of the features of service provisions that distinguish ARC is its focus on accomplishing three, fundamental objectives over the course of the 90 day program. These goals include:

  • Month 1 – Assessment and Diagnosis
  • Month 2 – Targeted Treatment
  • Month 3 – Supported Transition

The approach outlined by ARC, the level of personalized attention, coupled with the expertise provided by our cross disciplined, clinical staff coalesces to form comprehensive strategies that address the entire spectrum of treatment concerns. The phases of treatment employed over the course of a 90 day stay at ARC include:

Phase One – Assessment and Diagnosis

Typically, during the first month of treatment, issues are uncovered and identified that often require time to address and heal. A ubiquitous feature at this juncture of treatment is balancing the need to delve into core issues, against ensuring that the client is ready to accept certain truths about their condition. At this point, clinical protocols are employed in a general way, because each individual’s needs are different. For most people who are dual diagnosed, emotional and mental insight occurs slowly; with periods of stasis punctuated by moments of sporadic growth. Therefore, the longer one stays in treatment, the better their chances are of stabilizing, continuing to grow, and maintaining long-term recovery outside of a clinical setting. Services employed during phase one include:

Physiological Services

  • Acute and post-acute withdrawal treatment (onsite).
  • Medical concierge services.
  • Medication management.
  • Toxicology screening.
  • TB testing.
  • Lab work.

Clinical Services

  • Daily individual sessions.
  • Psychiatric evaluation.
  • Psychological assessment.
  • Bio/psych/social assessment.
  • Personalized treatment planning.
  • Multiaxial diagnostic assessment.

Phase Two – Targeted Treatment

One of the unique aspects of ARC’s 90 day inpatient rehab is that it incrementally facilitates internalization of a person’s responsibilities to their own growth. This internalization process is in part contingent upon addressing issues of neuro-stabilization. During the first 30 days of treatment, diagnostic measures can be hindered by the neuro-chemical dysfunction brought about by prolonged addiction. Essentially this means that individuals are frequently misdiagnosed at this juncture of their treatment, because their withdrawal symptomology is easily mistaken for symptoms of alternative, co-occurring mental health disorders.

At 60 days of treatment, the sub-acute and post acute withdrawal process can generate lingering symptoms that resemble symptoms of Anxiety Disorders, Depressive Disorders, and other Mood Disorders. As people participate in individual therapy and group therapy and delve deeper into the core issues that have fueled their addiction, these symptoms tend to diminish while simultaneously gaining clarity. Unfortunately, misdiagnosing symptoms is a common pitfall for treatment professionals. And it is common for therapists and physicians to confuse the Anxiety symptoms of post acute syndrome for symptoms of an actual Anxiety Disorder. It is imperative to long-term recovery that the client is given enough supervised time to enable an accurate psychological and emotional profile and baseline to be established from which diagnostic procedures can proceed. Through continued observation, both individually and on a group level, our trained professionals are able to distinguish between temporary symptomology and root psychiatric conditions.

Personalized Planning

As with all stages of psychological development, the 60 day period is transitional, and personal growth must be measured against the body’s adjustment to being drug-free, in addition to the person’s native traits, characteristics, and core mental health issues that are still being identified. It is during the second and third months of treatment that ARC’s residents earnestly begin to cultivate the life skills and coping strategies that will enable them to process their emotions and resolve conflicts in a healthy manner once they have graduated from treatment.

Life Skills Development

One of the strategies ARC employs at this juncture is to encourage residents to start taking overnight passes, the purpose of which is to gently expose them to their home environment and provide the clinical team time to address any areas of concern that might have gone unnoticed. It is inevitable that issues emerge at this time that remained elusive while the client was in the primary phase of treatment. The continued clinical services include:

Physiological Services

  • Ongoing post-acute withdrawal treatment (onsite).
  • Medical concierge services.
  • Medication management.

Clinical Services

  • Ongoing daily individual sessions.
  • Ongoing psychiatric and psychological consultation.
  • Career and aptitude testing.
  • Passions and interests assessment.
  • Ongoing personalized treatment planning.

Individual Clinical Modalities

  • Grief therapy.
  • Abuse therapy.
  • Trauma therapy.
  • Somatic therapy.
  • Reflective therapy.
  • Analytical therapy.
  • Insight-based therapy.
  • Reason-based therapy.
  • Psychodynamic therapy.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy.
  • Dialectical behavioral therapy.

Specialized Additional Clinical Modalities

  • Exposure therapy.
  • Experiential therapy.
  • Neurofeeedback (BrainPaint Biofeedback Program).

Phase Three – Supported Transition

The final phase of ARC’s 90 day program focuses on keeping the client engaged in the issues that have been uncovered over the course of their stay, in addition to preparing them to effectively deal with these issues outside of the structure and sanctuary of the residential setting. Ironically, although this final stage represents the end of treatment, in actuality it marks the beginning of the next phase of their recovery; the commencement of a new life guided by new priorities, new life skills, new coping strategies, and newly acquired communication techniques. During this stage of continuing care, new problems inevitably surface as the goals and objectives of each participant’s personal treatment plan are met.

Holistic Support and Aftercare Planning

This is an entirely natural development and easily surmounted with proper guidance. As new problem areas continue to be identified, the client’s clinical team continues to recalibrate the person’s treatment to reflect these developments. This can manifest in a number of different ways; vocational counseling, educational consulting, family therapy, exposure therapy, or continued couples’ counseling, etc. Each aspect of each person’s life is considered and contingency plans are drafted that address the “what ifs” and “what mights” that often occur shortly after leaving treatment. This entire process is rightfully considered to be an intense form of aftercare planning. Following graduation, people often choose to stay locally and stay connected to ARC’s community by enrolling in either ARC’s sober living or one of our affiliated sober livings, in addition to participating in the daypatient or evening outpatient programs. Regardless, aftercare planning takes all of these factors into consideration to provide real-time recommendations to each person in order to ensure the highest chance of continued recovery.

Ongoing after care services include:

  • Family Program.
  • Aftercare planning.
  • Participating in the Alumni Program.
  • Sober living.
  • Continued couples’ counseling.
  • Ongoing individual therapy.


Oct 15 | 2013
Tolerance

tolerance
The phenomenon of Tolerance emerges as one of the chief characteristics in the physiological and psychological make-up of every abuser, addict, or chemically dependent person. Tolerance, simply put, refers to the process by which the body acclimates to the presence of an abused drug. Occurring simultaneously with Tolerance is another physical phenomenon called Dependence. Dependence emerges alongside Tolerance and is the process by which body requires increasingly larger doses to experience the same results one initially experienced before Tolerance set in. In this regard the two phenomenon’s are not only bound to one another, but predictable hallmarks of addictive pathology, and emerge in virtually every scenario where prolonged abuse exists.

Common Misconceptions

It should be pointed out that the term Tolerance is frequently employed improperly and thus generates as much confusion as it does clarity. A common example of the term Tolerance being misapplied would be to refer to a person’s ability to consume large amounts of a drug and while maintaining an appearance of normality or a semblance of functionality. It is ironic that with regards to this example, it is in some respects not entirely incorrect, but these definitions lack the clinical context that make the term significant with regards to habituated abuse. Tolerance, it should be noted, cuts across drug types without regard for what substance is being abused; e.g., Tolerance can develop from abusing opiates as well as stimulants like Methamphetamine.

Wide Range of Origin

Significantly, one of the most striking features of Tolerance is its consistent presence in all cycle three variations of Abuse. For reasons of treatment protocol it is worth noting that Tolerance also develops regardless whether or not the drug was obtained legally (through a doctor) or purchased illegally (on the street). In other words, the body does not distinguish between opiates legally prescribed to manage post-surgical pain, any more than it distinguishes the effects of ingesting street narcotics such as heroin.

Further Overview of Condition

Before going any further it is necessary to enlarge upon the term and define precisely what Tolerance means. For clarity’s sake, what we mean when we refer to Tolerance is a physical and psychological appetite that develops and eventually emerges as its own distinct illness, complete with predicable symptomology and a fairly common set of stages through which the addict passes. Following prolonged use of certain medications, Tolerance occurs along the entire spectrum of abuse, because it occurs in the wake of prolonged consumption of some medication, be it sedative, Stimulant, and painkiller.

Multiple Routes of Development

As stated previously, Tolerance can manifest via several routes; which means it can develop regardless of whether the person is injecting, snorting, or smoking their drugs. Complicating matters is the fact that physiological Tolerance, which invariably develops in tandem with psychological dependence, frequently manifests as secondary mental health disorders such as Depression, Anxiety, or some form of Mood Disorder (a complete list of co-occurring disorders is outside of the scope of the particular article. Suffice to say where addiction occurs it is not uncommon to find the presence of other mental health conditions. When a person has been diagnosed with one or more co-occurring illnesses they are said to be dual diagnosed – more below). By the time Tolerance has developed, the addict has likely experienced the symptoms of other disorders; which essentially means that the person’s psychology is now compromised by competing disorders. This is clinically significant because it will shape the nature of the treatment administered.

Symptoms of Drug Tolerance

Some of the more common features of Tolerance include:

  • Irreversibility, meaning that once this psychic damage has developed, there is no known remedy that will enable the addict to revert back to a time before Tolerance was established.
  • Establishment of priorities in which drug-seeking or drug consumption takes precedence over other obligations.
  • The frequency of dosing increases, in addition to the quantities consumed, and the addict find themselves in a situation where the amount consumed on Monday no longer works by Friday.
  • Physiological tolerance also occurs when an organism builds up a resistance to the effects of a substance after repeated exposure. Ironically this can occur with environmental substances, such as salt or pesticides.

Drug Specific Causes

Complicating matters more deeply still is the fact that Tolerance does not emerge in a standardized way; meaning that the process is as much dependent on the individual as it is the drugs the individual is taking. For example, a person who needs to take morphine to control post-surgical pain will likely develop Tolerance (and Dependence) fairly quickly, without any regard for the intentions of the person taking the drug. The same person, if placed in a situation in which they were required to ingest sedatives such as Benzodiazepines, would develop tolerance as well, but guide the nuances of how the drug affects the body.

Classification of Tolerance Building Substances

It should be noted that all prescription medications are carefully regulated by the Federal Government with regards to prescribing protocols, which must be adhered to. This is especially true when dealing with major painkillers such as Oxycontin or Demerol. The government instituted what is referred to as a Scheduling System, which essentially rates a drug for its abuse potential. Schedule IV medications, which include substances such as blood pressure medication or insulin have virtually no abuse potential. There exist four different stages of scheduling, with I being considered the most addictive. Drugs that are considered to be Schedule I medications are so abusable they are deemed valueless and without medical efficacy. Heroin, Crack and Methamphetamine fall into this category. It should be noted again that drugs designed to treat chronic pain are highly addictive, and that there is a very real ratio between the painkiller’s effectiveness controlling pain and the intensity of the euphoria that is generated. Any analgesic or sedative will be proportionately as addictive as it is effective.

Rapid Tolerance Building Drugs

Opiates, which are the most commonly prescribed drugs to treat pain, generate effects similar to those of opium or morphine and are highly addictive. These drugs include:

  • Hydrocodone (brand name Vicodin).
  • Codeine, which comes in varying strengths from I to IV.
  • Morphine (brand name MS Contin)
  • Oxycodone (brand name OxyContin)
  • Meperidine (brand name Demerol)

High Risk Populations

A fair question is who is at risk to develop Tolerance. Most individuals who take pain medications in the manner consistent with what the physician orders do not become addicted to drugs nor do they exhibit tolerance (it does, however, happen from time to time). This scenario changes when dealing with someone for whom addiction is part of their history. In cases where a narcotic addict must take a painkiller for some procedure or condition are in for a very difficult time. People who have been addicted to some medication in the past, or those with a family history of addiction to drugs or alcohol may be at increased risk of becoming addicted to narcotics.

Prevention

  • The key to avoiding addiction is to take your medicine exactly as your doctor prescribes; not a moment too soon, and not doubling up on a dose if you missed one at dinner.
  • Share with your doctor any personal and/or family history of substance abuse or addiction. Your doctor needs this information to prescribe the medicines that will work best for you. Fears about addiction should not prevent you from using narcotics to effectively relieve your pain.
  • Remember, it is common for people to develop a Tolerance to their pain medication and to need higher doses to achieve the same level of pain relief. Such a situation is normal and is not a sign of addiction. However, you should talk to your doctor if this effect becomes troubling.

Drug Tolerance

Drug Tolerance refers to the body’s ability governed by genetic factors and adaptive changes by the body. Adaptive changes occur in response to the repeated exposure to a particular drug. The result is usually a loss of sensitivity to the drug. This decreased response is called Tolerance
Tolerance may be defined as a state of progressively decreased responsiveness to a drug as a result of which a larger dose of the drug is needed to achieve the effect originally obtained by a smaller dose.

Drug Dependence

There are two types of drug dependence.

Physical Dependence

Physical dependence is a condition in which the body has adjusted to the presence of a drug, resulting in clear symptoms of withdrawal when its use stops. In extreme cases, the effect of rapid withdrawal can be life threatening because the body has become so dependent on the drug as to interfere with normal body processes.

An individual physically dependent on a drug requires that drug in order to function normally. Physical dependence is associated with Tolerance in most cases. The state of physical dependence is revealed by withdrawing the drug and noting the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms sometime after the drug is withheld. The symptoms of withdrawal can be terminated by re-administration of the drug.

Symptoms of drug withdrawal tend to be the opposite of the effects of the drug. If the effect of the drug is sedation, the withdrawal effect will likely be hyper-excitability. If the effect was stimulation the withdrawal effect will likely be emotional depression.

Longer acting drugs tend to produce less intense withdrawal symptoms because the body has more time to adapt to the decreasing presence of the drug.

Psychological Dependence

This kind of dependence is characterized by emotional and mental preoccupation with the drug’s effects and by a persistent craving for it. The symptoms displayed are not physical symptoms. Craving seems to be the most common withdrawal symptom.

Psychological dependence is usually manifested by compulsive drug-taking, but the frequency and pattern of use can differ considerably from one individual to another.

Cross-Dependence

This is the ability of one drug to suppress the manifestations of physical dependence produced by another and to maintain the physically dependent state. Cross dependence may be partial or complete. One amphetamine will show cross dependence with other amphetamines. Most sedatives show cross dependence with each other and with alcohol. Cross dependence usually occurs among compounds of a given family of drugs but may also occur among drugs of different families that have similar pharmacological effects.

General Information about Addiction

Addiction is a difficult word to define since it can be used in various ways. The World Health Organization (WHO) has provided the following definition: “A behavioral pattern of drug use, characterized by overwhelming involvement with the use of a drug (compulsive use), the securing of the supply, and a high tendency to relapse after withdrawal. Addiction is viewed as an extreme on a continuum of drug use patterns. It refers, in a quantitative rather an a qualitative sense, to the degree to which drug use pervades the total life activity of the user, and to the range of circumstances in which drug use controls his/her behavior.”

Addiction refers to dependent patterns of drug self-administration without making a distinction between physical or psychological dependence. Moral weakness is often implied by the term addiction.

The WHO has suggested that the term “addiction” be replaced with the term “drug dependence.” It is not possible to identify with precision the point where compulsive use should be considered addiction.

The term addiction cannot be used interchangeably with physical dependence since one can be physically dependent on drugs without being addicted and – as stated elsewhere – in some cases, addicted without being physically dependent.

Self-administration of drugs:

  • The properties of the drug itself.
  • The route of administration.
  • The size of the individual dose.
  • The amount of work required to obtain a dose.
  • The presence of other drugs.
  • Previous experience with other drugs.

Scientific studies have shown that pre-existing mental and behavioral disorders are not a prerequisite for drug use and that drugs themselves are powerful reinforces, even in the absence of physical dependence. This discovery radically alters how we treat addiction and many of the assumptions we make with regards to the expression of its pathology.

Call to Learn More about the Authentic Recovery Center

If you are interested in learning more about the Authentic Recovery Center call 1 877 415 4673 now. We offer multiple types of treatment for co-occurring disorders and addiction, including inpatient and outpatient rehab options. With a program focus on the underlying issues that contribute to scenarios from which drug tolerance develops, we provide a platform for sustainable recovery and change. Remember, “The only failure in life is the failure to act.”



Oct 01 | 2013
Psychological Dependence Alcohol
psychologic-dependence-alcohol

Psychological Dependency

According to the APA, Psychological Dependence refers to a mental a cycle where one is “dependent on a psychoactive substance for the reinforcement it provides”. To the lay person, what this signifies is that the physiological response to the medication or drug precipitates and simultaneously reinforces its continued abuse. For reasons of diagnostic criteria, this generally falls under the heading Addiction, and are typically indivisible as phenomenon whereby craving is generated. The term with regards to Addiction refers to a particular substance that the Addict abuses compulsively because of the enjoyable mental affects it generates.

Causes of Dependence

Typically, people become Dependent on something because its ingestion becomes associated with alleviation of mental duress. This mental duress can manifest as Depression, Anxiety, or a host of other uncomfortable emotional states, but it is the cessation of discomfort that reinforces and creates the Psychological Dependence, as opposed to the physical Dependence manifesting as a result of the emotional relief. As with other forms of Addiction, each successive use tends to reinforce the next, and where Physiological Addiction is present, the affect is that much more amplified.
With regards to Addiction per se, the term is actually falling out favor because Psychological Dependence is now associated with a number of compulsive behaviors that are not necessarily defined by abuse of a medication or drug. Psychological Dependence now refers to gambling disorders, sexually compulsive disorders, in addition to eating disorders and even internet pornography. This is in part due to the inexact and vague nature of the term itself. The fact that the term is so elastic – that it covers such a broad range of behaviors that as often as not have nothing to do with Addiction to a substance – but rather a lifestyle has given rise to the use of the term Dependence instead.

Symptoms of Addiction

Additionally, as researchers learn more about Addiction as a medical condition, the term Psychological Dependence has also lost footing. Today, Addiction is viewed as a complex interplay between psychological and emotional factors, in addition to physiological traits and genetic predispositions.
Generally speaking, features of Addiction include:

  • Preoccupation with alcohol and drugs.
  • Inability to control one’s drinking or using.
  • Increased tolerance to alcohol or drugs.
  • The presence of Dependence, which typically manifests with withdrawal symptoms.
  • Continued Abuse, despite increasingly severe and negative consequences.
  • Distortions in thinking, usually demonstrated by what is referred to as Denial.

With the exception of the last entry – denial – Addiction specialists more and more have come to regard the process of Addiction as being a process that occurs on a physiological level, with the psychological traits taking shape after the physical tendencies have taken form. At ARC, Addiction is treated comprehensively, which means that both the emotional factors and underlying physiology is simultaneously treated as parts of the whole; where the division between the Physiological Addiction and Psychological Addiction, at least with regards to treatment protocols, is largely false. Suffice to say by the time a person is in need of residential or outpatient treatment, Chemical Dependency has progressed into something far more overreaching than merely a set of maladaptive, abusive behaviors and tendencies. Detoxification is rarely enough, and in order for the Dependent person to truly surmount their own pathological pitfalls and enjoy a life of recovery they must be willing to confront and deconstruct a series of personality traits, assumptions, and belief systems that are intertwined with their active Dependency.

Drugs with Abuse Potential

The following list is by no means comprehensive, and there is available a multitude of drugs not on this list that nonetheless have enormous Abuse potential (it should be noted that, as such, each of the following substances listed occurs with its own set of psychological characteristics; each of which require specialized attention to adequately address). However, for the sake of expediency, the following substances are the most frequently abused and include:

  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Hallucinogens
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Opiates
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Inhalants
  • Methamphetamine
  • Nicotine


Sep 15 | 2013
How To Choose A Drug Rehab
how-to-choose-a-drug-rehab

How to Get Started in Drug Rehab

Option One: Simply Call Us

If you know you need treatment for addiction or co-occurring disorders call 1 877 415 4673 to speak with a licensed counselor. This is the fastest and most efficient way to get started with rehabilitation.

Option Two: Review the Information on Our Website

If you are not yet sure our program is right for you, take some time to review our website. Whether or not you choose our drug rehab you will be able to gain valuable information about addiction, dual diagnosis, and most importantly, our treatment philosophy.

Option Three: Schedule a Tour

If you are local to the greater Los Angeles area call us to schedule a tour. We are available to facilitate tours 7 days a week. Please call to schedule your tour prior to coming. Confidentiality is very important to us and without an appointment you will be turned away to protect the identity of our clients. If you are not able to tour in person, and there is someone you trust in the area to come by on your behalf, feel free to have your loved one or friend call us for an appointment time.

Option Four: Take a Virtual Tour

You may take a virtual tour of the facility in the about section of our website. To navigate forward or back, simply click the arrows with your mouse.

Option Five: Submit a Confidential Inquiry

If you would prefer to contact us electronically simply submit your questions via the contact form at the top right of this page. Provide as much information as you like and please remember that the more detailed you are, the more thorough we can be in response to your questions. We respond to emails quickly.

Research is important! Directory World can be a good place to start!



Aug 15 | 2013
The Top 5 Reasons People Choose ARC
TOP-5-REASONS

The Top 5 Reasons People Choose ARC

Here are the top five reasons people choose the Authentic Recovery Center:

Reason 1 – Individual Therapy

We offer daily individual therapy sessions. Continual one on one therapy is one of the most important ingredients that is lacking in other drug and alcohol rehab centers.

Reason 2 – Small Program Size

We provide treatment to only 6-12 people at a time. The small size of our program prevents people from slipping into the cracks typically found in larger, behavior-modification facilities.

Reason 3 – Multiple Treatment Options

Every client is unique. Our goal is to meet the needs of each individual. We offer multiple treatment options including detoxification, residential and outpatient programs.

Reason 4 – Personalized Approach

Individuals seeking help have a unique set of issues that bring them into treatment. Our philosophy is that treatment must be tailored to address these issues.

Reason 5 – Affordability

When compared side by side with other treatment centers, our program is the most cost-effective dual diagnosis alcohol and drug rehab center in the United States.

Call to Speak with a Licensed Clinician Today

If you are interested in learning more about our comprehensive approach for co-occurring disorders and addiction treatment call us today. We recognize that choosing a treatment center can seem very overwhelming. We can help. If you would like to speak with us call 1 877 415 4673 now.



Jul 15 | 2013
How to Conduct An Intervention

how-to-conduct-an-intervention
Drug and Alcohol Interventions should never be confrontational. Emotions may span the entire spectrum of human experience from grief, helplessness, and anger, to disbelief, denial, and even joking about their plight. Indeed, the first rule when considering an intervention is to dispense the idea of confrontation and replace it with the concept of presentation and education. Communication is absolutely paramount, and it might fairly be said that successful interventions are studies in the art of diplomacy. Most important is bearing in mind that ultimately, when performed correctly, an intervention is an offering of love to the person who is in need of help.

What an Intervention Really Is – and Isn’t

All the things you should know about drug and alcohol interventions.
Most people who find themselves considering an intervention are usually desperate, afraid, and backed against a wall. The idea of coordinating an intervention is usually a last resort after numerous attempts at communicating with the addict have failed. There is often a sense of hopelessness that an intervention will even work. In many scenarios, the thought of doing an intervention carries with it the doubt that even trying one will worsen the situation. But an intervention, if done properly and respectfully, will help.

Interventions merely interrupt the skipping record of addiction.
An intervention will help because it’s designed to be an interruption. It’s not something to be undertaken lightly, but when done correctly, it’s not even a confrontation. All an intervention is designed to do is create a chance for change. The intervention represents a chance to interrupt the addicts behavior, so that the needle of the addicts record might stop the destructive skip of addictive pathology and start playing a healthy tune of life again.

Interventions are a presentation – not a confrontation.
Interventions are at their core, a presentation. A presentation of love and concern for the addict. The presenting of information that offers an opportunity. An opportunity for change.

Interventions don’t make it any worse.
Intervention can neither guarantee change, or make things worse. This is the most important think to really understand when considering intervening on an alcoholic or addict. Interventions represent a chance for things to get better, where there is no chance otherwise. The question is really only, “Do you want to have that chance?”. By its very nature intervention is a difficult process. Directly related to an addicts or alcoholics level of denial, a professional interventions are often a last resort for families and loved ones who know first hand the powerful grip of addiction. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that an intervention will be successful. At least, if your definition of successful is that the afflicted enrolls immediately in a treatment center. But that’s not really what an intervention is about. An intervention is as much about freeing those that care from the question, “Have I done all that I can do?”, as it is about getting someone to say they will go to a program. In truth, this is the most important part of an intervention working. If you act out of desperation, with the sole hope that the addict or alcoholic will go to treatment, then you’re going about it in an ineffective way.

How to Conduct an Intervention

There are several stages to a successful alcohol intervention or drug intervention what will hopefully all lead towards medical detox. In most situations it is advisable to first intervene with family members, loved ones, or caring individuals before engaging with a professional interventionist.

Identification And Intention
Identify what your emotional state is in relationship to your loved ones chemical dependency issues. Are you angry? Are you desperate? Are you concerned? (Remember: It is impossible to be angry about something you don’t care about) Create a personal intention to help your loved one by having a conversation with them about their chemical dependency issues. (If you don’t do something to help its possible that no one else will either.)

Investigate And Research
Investigate drug treatment centers. Identify the facility you would like to enroll your loved one in. Utilize the facility for support with any questions you might have about the pending conversation. Whenever possible, a professional intervention can greatly increase the chances of an initial conversation resulting in appropriate placement for drug and alcohol treatment.

The Conversation
Remain calm. Be focused on your intention to help. Any conversation about chemical dependency should come from a place of love and concern. Talk quietly with loved ones about your intention to help the person suffering. Ask them if they are willing to participate in supporting you stage a conversation with the person suffering from chemical dependency.Choose an appropriate place to have the conversation. Remember that the stage should be set with the idea of creating a safe environment for talking. The venue should be private and free of distractions. Have the conversation. Be clear that you are not angry. Share your solidarity and support for the person suffering. Recall positive memories you have shared your loved one. Talk about how you want the old person back. Be sure to use “I” statements. Say, “I have observed your struggle lately” or, “I notice that you often appear unhappy.” Talk about how things seem to be upside down for your loved one. Say, “We know a place that can help.”

The Result
If your loved one is willing to go to a facility, finalize the arrangements for their enrollment. (It is important to capitalize on the decision to go. A lot can happen prior to admission to a drug treatment center. Do whatever is necessary to expedite their safe admission; transportation, helping pack them, etc.) Do not set any significant consequences if there is a lack of motivation to enter a drug treatment center. Do not get into a power struggle with the person suffering. If they refuse to go, give them some time to think about the love and concern you have expressed. Say that you would like to revisit this conversation in a couple days. See whether there are any positive changes or internal shifts that are made during that time by the person suffering from chemical dependency.

Methods of Interventions And Entering Treatment

There are as many different styles of interventions (for example The Family Systemic Model, The Invitational Model, The Motivational Model) as there are people in need of them and we recommend you do more research before embarking on one. There is no perfect answer to when an intervention is appropriate, although it might be the most important conversation you have on behalf of the addict you’re trying to help. People are different, and the ways in which they process information and the manner in which this information influence their development, make generalizations dangerous. There exist situations in which an addict becomes so psychologically unstable that they pose a danger to themselves or to others, and outside measures become an absolute necessity. In cases such as this, cases in which a psych hold might be employed (where the addict is confined against their will in some medical or psychiatric facility for a 3 day period of observation), during which time stabilization can occur. Education and awareness are the first steps to acquiring help. Hopefully this article will assist giving you a foundation of knowledge that will make selecting the correct course easier to determine.



Jul 01 | 2013
Alcohol Abuse vs Alcohol Addiction
alcohol-abuse-vs-alcohol-addiction

Alcohol Abuse vs. Alcohol Addiction

For diagnostic purposes and purposes of treatment, professionals distinguish between Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Addiction. The main feature setting apart these two phenomena is that they tend to move in one direction: e.g., over time, Abuse leads to Addiction, but, theoretically, one can remain addicted indefinitely and still maintain the semblance of an ordered life. Although this might have the appearance of splitting hairs, the distinction is highly significant for the purposes of establishing relevant treatment protocols.

Signs of Alcohol Abuse

Generally speaking, Alcohol Abuse exhibits the following traits or behaviors:

  • Acquiring mounting legal troubles, such as getting arrested for either possession or DUI.
  • Financial instability.
  • Continued abuse in the face of deteriorating personal relations.
  • Deterioration of performance at work or at school.
  • Engaging in risky behaviors with regards to sex or adrenaline stimulation. This might include promiscuity, e.g., enjoying multiple partners while intoxicated, or driving when intoxicated.

Signs of Alcohol Addiction

In contrast to symptoms or behaviors associated with Abuse, traits of Addiction frequently indicate the presence of far more entrenched pathology and include characteristics associated with other mental health disorders. In addition to the symptoms already mentioned, Addiction symptoms include:

  • Enduring physical, mental, or emotional withdrawal symptoms if unable to acquire the substance.
  • The development of a tolerance to the drug(s) being abused.
  • Consuming quantities that are deleterious to one’s health.
  • An inability to regulate one’s usage or stop altogether.
  • Physical dependence.

Effective Treatment is Specific to the Problems Identified

Again, for purposes of treatment protocols and the clinical trajectory one’s treatment might take, the distinction between Abuse and Addiction is significant. Alcohol Addiction, as opposed to Alcohol Abuse, is almost invariably complicated by the presence of multiple disorders or co-occurring conditions. True Addiction almost universally generates suffering from some other form of mental illness that is not necessarily present where there is abuse. Anxiety Disorders, Depression, Mood Disorders and Personality Disorders – these are all mitigating factors that must be factored into treatment and that further demarcate the difference between Abusive behaviors and behaviors that result from full-blown Addiction.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

At ARC, our clinical program and our treatment team is specifically trained to address the many facets of the Addictive condition. ARC’s multidimensional approach includes medical interventions overseen by our MDs, who work in conjunction with our therapists and clinical staff to ensure that a treatment plan is created and adhered to that gives the client the best possible chances for recovery. ARC’s Treatment Services include:

  • The most advanced and effective Dual Diagnosis treatment available.
  • Comprehensive assessments that take into consideration both medical, psychological, and emotional factors.
  • Detoxification services that are closely monitored by our trained staff and overseen by independent doctors.
  • A dignified approach that honors the total needs of the client.
  • Counseling that includes Family Counseling, Group counseling, as well as One-on-One Counseling.
  • Ongoing therapy with clinicians who specialize in Addiction pathology.
  • Long-term treatment planning that includes Aftercare, Extended Care, and Alumni services.
  • Integrated treatment, specially designed to treat Dual Diagnosed individuals. This includes psychiatric care, oversight of medications, and continued aftercare.

Call to Learn More about the Authentic Recovery Center

This is by no means a comprehensive picture of the services ARC provides. Please visit the other sections of our website to better understand the full spectrum of Addiction Treatment options available to you or your loved one. Education is the most important tool available to you, and keeping current on latest treatment practices is the best way to ensure you or someone you love receives the care they need. If you would like to learn more about our Dual Diagnosis treatment services please call 1 877 415 4673 to speak with a counselor today.



Jun 01 | 2013
Signs Of Alcohol Addiction
signs-of-alcohol-addiction

Signs of Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol Addiction vs. Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are not synonymous terms, although they are frequently used interchangeably, which give rise to confusion regarding what differentiates one condition from the other. Clinically speaking, Alcohol Abuse manifests as a cluster of maladaptive behaviors that in their own right are highly destructive to the life of the drinker, in addition to being detrimental to their mental and physical health. Alcohol Abuse, though clinically different from Alcohol Addiction, is nonetheless a progressive condition that over time tends to worsen and in its own right requires treatment.

Definition of Alcohol Addiction

Having stated thus, it is significant that Alcohol Addiction, on the other hand, or Alcoholism, is not just a cluster of behaviors that define Abusive behavior, but is an entrenched, pathologically deteriorating disease that is marked by specific psychological impairments, and frequently manifests in the presence of other mental health disorders – what are referred to as co-occurring disorders – the presence of which is regarded in the field of Addiction as what is known as a Dual Diagnosis (more below), a complex set of traits, tendencies, behaviors and characteristics that taken together present distinct challenges to even the most competent treatment teams.

Differences Between Abuse and Addiction

To be clear, then, Alcohol Abuse, per se, differs from Alcoholic Addiction because it typically lacks the nuances and subtle differences that occur with regards to other mental health disorders, whereas Alcohol Addiction is distinguished by a complex interplay between inherited, genetic traits, learned coping mechanisms, and psychological features. Another feature of Alcohol Addiction is the presence of traits and behaviors that often manifest and which have no bearing whatsoever on any drug, medication, or liquor.

Behavioral Symptoms of Alcohol Addiction

Today, current research suggests that there is a host of conditions that are defined by compulsive traits that often have little or nothing to do with Addiction or Abuse. Compulsively over eating, acting out sexually or gambling, are examples of compulsive disorders that fall into the category of Addiction rather than abuse. It is for this reason that Alcohol Addiction earns its own page and needs to be regarded differently from Abuse; and why experts in the treatment field of substance abuse make a distinction between Abuse and Alcoholism. Indeed, one of the chief differences between the two conditions is that, unlike Alcoholics, Alcohol Abusers frequently have some ability to set limits on their drinking; however destructive and dangerous to themselves or others their Abuse might be; for a genuine Alcoholic, this would be virtually impossible.

Some of the more common signs of alcohol addiction include:

  • Chronically neglecting responsibilities with regards to hygiene, work, and parenting.
  • Erosion of relationships with friends or significant others.
  • Demonstrating difficulties in school.
  • Difficulty maintaining employment
  • There are virtually hundreds of scenarios in which Addiction will express itself in the course of an Alcoholic’s day, which range from dodging creditors to lying about liquor consumption to simply making them unavailable to their family, their friends, or their employers.
  • Consuming liquor in manners and ways that puts themselves physically in harm’s way. Examples of this include driving intoxicated, reaching alcohol toxicity, sustaining health problems such as cirrhosis, or mixing liquor with other drugs to amplify the effects of the alcohol.
  • Acquiring mounting legal troubles. This might include theft from an employer (embezzlement), to getting arrested for driving under the influence (DUI.); in addition to the myriad ways in which Alcoholic’s act-out with anti-social behaviors.
  • Acquiring tolerance and dependence to liquor, a state which defines the Addictive process and virtually defines all Addictive conditions. What this means is that over time the individual requires increasingly larger and larger doses to function, as well as maintain the initial effects of the liquor.
  • Continuing to drink despite increasingly catastrophic consequences, such as unemployment, abuse, or neglect of children, in addition to deteriorating relationship of every kind. Included on this list can be drinking despite the feelings of self-loathing that tend to haunt the Addict or Alcoholic, and in turn are used by the Alcoholic to rationalize future compulsive behaviors.
  • Drinking with the specific goal of alleviating stress or to even out, or, even more sinister, drinking to stave off withdrawal symptoms.

Physical Symptoms of Alcohol Addiction

It is worth noting that although Alcohol Abuse is certainly worrisome and causes disastrous consequences in one’s life, Alcoholism is the most severe form of problem drinking a treatment team will have to deal with. Other signs and symptoms of Alcohol Addiction that commonly occur include:

  • Experiencing Anxiety when not drinking.
  • Demonstrating shakiness or tremors.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Sweating.
  • Disruptions in sleep patterns; e.g. insomnia or an inability to remain asleep.
  • Experiencing anhedonia or depression.
  • Restlessness.
  • Agitation.
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite or fluctuation in weight; e.g. weight gain or weight loss.

Additional Signs of Alcohol Addiction

For loved ones dealing with an active Alcoholic, it is a fine line between setting boundaries that protect them from further damage and exposure to the loved one who is drinking, and trying to support that same loved one in a way that neither harms them or enables them. This is a difficult course to navigate and should not be attempted without support. There are resources available to Alcoholic’s no matter how isolated they might feel; and isolation is a hallmark of both the condition of the Alcohol Addict as it is for their friends and loved ones – the condition literally takes innocent bystanders and hold them hostage, ransoming them off as necessary in a bid to continue drinking.
Still more signs to watch for that indicates the presence of Alcohol Addiction includes:

  • An apparent loss of control over one’s liquor consumption.
  • The drinker wants to stop but is unable on their own to achieve sobriety.
  • Alcohol has steadily eroded interest in hobbies or other areas of interests that once occupied the drinker’s time.
  • Hiding bottles.
  • Lying about when and how much liquor one has consumed.

Signs of Denial

In tandem with these manifestations is the state of Denial that plagues every Addict or Alcoholic into treatment, which essentially refers to a person’s inability to honestly assess their condition or how their condition is impacting those around them. Denial, though not in itself necessarily crippling, is nonetheless a state of mind – an attitude, if you will, or an orientation – that will have to be addressed and dismantled at some point in the treatment process; preferably sooner, to facilitate the Alcoholic’s recovery and forward growth.



May 15 | 2013
Physical Dependency
physical-dependence

Physical Dependency

Physical Dependency refers to a state of chronic Dependence on a medication or drug resulting from prolonged abuse. The state is characteristically defined by an increase in Tolerance and Dependence in which negative consequences occur despite continued use. It is additionally defined by symptoms of withdrawal when cessation of the drug takes place. Physical Dependence can occur from prolonged use of sedatives, pain killers, or stimulants, but is defined by similar sets of consequences.

Withdrawal Stages

Traditionally, the larger the dose, the greater the Dependence that sets in. Withdrawal symptoms can last anywhere from days to weeks to months, depending on the drugs being abused; and the process typically occurs in stages. After the initial withdrawal symptoms have set in, the addict passes into what are referred to as post-acute withdrawal symptoms, also known as PAWS, which are referred to as secondary symptoms that tend to be less intense but that linger for indeterminate amounts of time. Traditionally, in cycles where relapse defines the addictive pathology, there is an inability to maintain employment and personal relationships. This cycle, one taken hold, can literally last for months or even years, with the passage of time entrenching and reinforcing the addictive tendencies.

Benzodiazepine Complications

Protracted withdrawal symptoms tend to emerge with abuse of sedative, specifically a class of drugs known as Benzodiazepines, a class of minor tranquilizers that are prescribed for a number of different ailments. Some of the more common Benzodiazepines prescribed include:

  • Valium – diazepam
  • Xanax – Alprazolam
  • Librium – Chlordiazepoxide
  • Klonopin – Clonazepam
  • Dalmane – flurazepam:

As previously stated, protracted withdrawal syndrome is most often caused by long-term abuse of Benzodiazepines, but is also present in a majority of cases of alcohol and opioid addiction. Although withdrawal symptoms vary from person to person, according to the substances being abused, they nevertheless follow a fairly predictable course of action. Physical dependence can manifest in both physiological symptoms and also psychological traits. Typically, the withdrawal symptoms manifest according to the drug’s effect on the central nervous system.

Symptoms of Dependence

Physical dependence can manifest itself in the appearance of both physical and psychological symptoms which are caused by physiological adaptions in the central nervous system and the brain due to chronic exposure to a substance. Symptoms frequently include:

  • Increased heart rate and/or blood pressure.
  • Sweating, and tremors.
  • Confusion.
  • Seizures.
  • Cramps.
  • Body aches and pains.
  • Hallucinations.

The Importance of Medical Support

Barbiturates, alcohol, and Benzodiazepine withdrawal frequently require medical attention because of the risk of major seizures and the risk of cardiac arrest. In cases where a person is withdrawing from drug in which this is a factor, medical attention and the oversight of a physician trained in addiction medicine is required. Other factors that require the care of a physician include electrolyte dysfunction and arrhythmias.

Drug Dependence can Happen to Anyone

It should be noted that anyone can become physically dependent on a drug or medication. Theoretically, anyone can become dependent on a medication or drug, without necessarily exhibiting the pathology that occurs when addiction is present. Individuals who, with respect to drugs or alcohol, manifest no compulsive features or traits can actually become chemically dependent, even if the process unfolds inadvertently. One common scenario is a person has to take opiates to control post-surgical pain. In this scenario, if the person ingests the opiates for long enough, they will develop both tolerance to, and dependence on, the medication, again, without necessarily exhibiting the driving compulsive pathology that must exist for a diagnosis of Addiction to be made. Usually, however, most individuals for whom Dependency has become an issue also demonstrate traits that are associated with Compulsive conditions, in addition to developing secondary mental health disorders that exacerbate the primary disorder.

Signs of Addictive Dependency

The most common features of Dependency at this stage include:

  • Preoccupation with alcohol and drugs.
  • Inability to control one’s drinking or using.
  • Increased tolerance to alcohol or drugs.
  • The presence of Dependence, which typically manifests with withdrawal symptoms.
  • Continued Abuse, despite increasingly severe and negative consequences.
  • Distortions in thinking, usually demonstrated by what is referred to as Denial.

Treatment Methods

To date there is no cure for alcohol addiction or chemical dependency, although with proper, comprehensive treatment it can successfully be arrested (see more below).
Suffice to say by the time a person is in need of residential or outpatient treatment; chemical dependency has progressed into something far more overreaching than merely a set of maladaptive, abusive behaviors and tendencies. Detoxification is rarely enough, and in order for the Dependent person to truly surmount their own pathological pitfalls and enjoy a life of recovery they must be willing to confront and deconstruct a series of personality traits, assumptions, and belief systems that are intertwined with their active Dependency.

Drugs with Habit Forming Potential

The following list is by no means comprehensive, and there is available a multitude of drugs not on this list that nonetheless have enormous Abuse potential. However, for the sake of expediency, the following substances are the most frequently abused and include:

  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Hallucinogens
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Opiates
  • Anabolic steroids
  • Inhalants
  • Methamphetamine
  • Nicotine


May 01 | 2013
Drug Detoxification
drug-rehab-los-angeles-drug-detoxification

Drug Detoxification

Addiction treatment begins with detoxification, which is the process by which the body rids itself of toxins. Generally speaking, detoxification is considered a medically-managed procedure, and as such is overseen by a physician trained in addiction medicine, who is therefore skilled at creating a regiment that eases one’s transition into recovery and sobriety. At this phase, medically-managed treatment and the protocols administered by the prescribing doctor will be informed by the kind of drugs the addict has been abusing. Some drugs are easier to detoxify from, others less so, and produce uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms that range from moderate to severe.

General Information

Opiate withdrawal, for example, which includes withdrawal from drugs like heroin and Oxycontin, produces severely uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. In most cases the withdrawal symptoms that accompany opiate detoxification are so severe that without a medically-managed detox, an individual’s chances of achieving long-term sobriety are minimal. Other detoxes, such as detoxification from alcohol, absolutely require the supervision of a medical doctor, without which in rare cases can be fatal. Following detoxification an assessment is made to determine the best possible course of treatment to meet the needs of the client.

Detox Precedes Diagnosis

The medically-managed component of addiction treatment also addresses other mental health issues that may be contributing to an individual’s condition and over all functionality. This is pertinent for a number of reasons, the most important being that once the detox phase is complete, and the addict has been physically relived of their detox symptoms, the shape and nature of the treatment provided will be an extension of what has been employed during the primary care phase. In situations in which disorders are co-occurring, the client is said to be dual diagnosed, which to successfully treat requires expertise across several disciplines, in addition to a treatment team specifically trained to deal with all of the clinical factors that present in this particular scenario.

Detox is the First Step

The co-occurring disorders that most commonly attend addiction are conditions such as Depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or some form of Anxiety Disorder (there are, of course, a host of other disorders an addict might be suffering from, but that lay outside the scope of this article). It should be stated that detoxification is but the first step an addict takes into recovery a larger world. The commitment necessary to detox and physically get one’s self clean must carry-over into the later phases of treatment, without which recovery is difficult, if not impossible, to maintain. In order to facilitate this process, ARC’s staff employs a combination of clinical expertise, in addition to the best, evidence based techniques and procedures available, which greatly increases an addict’s chances of stabilizing and maintaining long-term recovery. In addition to the competency of ARC’s treatment team, is the community ARC creates for its clients, which is inclusive, dignified, and flexible in a way that honors the needs of each individual. This community is absolutely vital to the well-being of the addict, and ultimately becomes its own therapeutic tool. This aspect of treatment, although in some ways intangible, is nonetheless a crucial element of an addict’s experience in treatment and their ability to enjoy prolonged recovery.



Apr 15 | 2013
Best Rehab Program
arc-drug-rehab-program

We Offer a Comprehensive Clinical Approach

Unlike 100 years ago, when addiction was viewed as a moral problem, today we recognize that there are a host of factors that contribute to addictive pathology. In order for addiction treatment to be effective these elemental materials that culminate in substance abuse pathology have to be addressed during our drug rehab program.

ARC understand these contributing factors and offers each client personalized treatment plans so they can receive the benefit of the most advanced and comprehensive clinical techniques available to successfully overcome addiction problems.

We Provide Integrated Treatment

This section describes some of the medical, clinical and therapeutic services that are included within the scope of our all-inclusive co-occurring disorders treatment program.

Individual Therapy

Each client is offered 3-5 one on one therapy sessions per week. One on one therapy is important due to the proven effectiveness of this modality in supporting people with dual diagnosis issues. To learn more about this therapies we offer visit individual therapy.

Psychological Evaluation

Each client is offered the benefit of a psychological evaluation, with follow up evaluations as treatment progresses. This treatment tool is an important measure to substantiate the presence of certain psychiatric and psychological disorders. To learn more about this service visit psychological evaluation.

Psychiatric Assessment

We offer each client an initial psychiatric assessment, with follow up visits as treatment continues forward. This treatment tool is important in order to substantiate the presence of specific psychiatric disorders and determine whether supportive medications are needed. To learn more about this service visit >psychiatric assessment.

Case Management

We offer each client case management services throughout the rehabilitation process. This resource is important as a tool to help people deal with employers, colleges, court systems and other factors outside of the treatment setting. To learn more about this service visit case management.

Personalized Treatment Plans

We offer each client the individualized treatment planning. This customized aspect of our drug rehab program is important because it supports each person specifically by identifying their unique problems, goals, and objectives during treatment. To learn more about this service visit personalized treatment plans.

Multiaxial Diagnostic Assessment

We offer each client the benefit of a multiaxial diagnostic assessment. This is an important tool that helps the clinical team target the entire clinical process on the actual issues that need to be addresses during treatment. To learn more about this service visit multiaxial diagnostic assessment.

Medical Evaluation

Each client receives an independent medical evaluation. This resource allows clients to safely complete detoxification and address any medically-related problems while in rehab. To learn more about this service visit medical evaluation.

Multiple Treatment Options

We offer client’s multiple choices for how to do treatment. Our program consists of many rehab options and includes various types of residential and outpatient care. This allows people more flexibility upon enrollment and in how they do aftercare. To learn more about these programs visit levels of care.

Interdisciplinary Treatment Team

We offer each client the benefit of an interdisciplinary treatment team. Clients have the opportunity to work with multiple clinicians to see what works best for them. To learn more about this service visit interdisciplinary treatment team.

We Treat the Core Issues

Many people don’t fully understand what creates a behavioral or mental health problem. Fortunately, we do. This section provides you with a picture of how problems develop and helps you to gain a better grasp on how effective the ARC approach is.

Factors that Contribute to Addiction

Genetic Predisposition

There is a lot of evidence that points to how genetics play a significant role in developing alcoholism, addiction, and drug abuse pathology. Concurrent with this is the fact that genetics can play a huge role in the development of mental health issues. Genetic influencers cannot be changed, but certain types of therapy are very effective in harnessing the role genetics play in a positive way. For example, CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) is a great therapeutic tool for helping newly recovering individuals to understand why they have been responding to life in the way that they have. Although some traditional drug treatment centers apply cognitive therapy in group settings, in order for CBT to truly productive the technique has to be applied in individual therapy sessions.

Environment

The type of environment a person grows up in has a direct effect on raising or lowering the likelihood that they will develop alcoholism, addiction, drug abuse, or co-occurring disorders at some point in their lifetime. Again, although this is a generally understood aspect of addiction, it is often overlooked during the actual treatment process. For example, past environmental factors cannot be changed, but understanding how those environments affected the individual in treatment is a critical component of being able to reach them. Treatment has to be designed in such a way to reach people where they are at – especially in being consistent in the language used to establish rapport. Our clinical team consists of a variety of experienced professionals with a variety of backgrounds. Where many traditional treatment centers simply assign a case manager to an incoming client based on the current case load, we assign case managers and therapists based on a comprehensive evaluation of which staff members will be able to reach each client.

Personal Psychology

Some people are more naturally curious about alcohol and drugs than others. This is simply part of some peoples personality types. For example, if this curiosity about mind-altering substances is part of an individual’s psychological make-up, they will naturally acclimate towards experimentation with drugs. This propensity increases the likelihood they will develop drug abuse pathology if other factors are also present. Treatment has to be designed to address each client’s personal psychology and to create healthy outlets and new forms of self-expression. Where traditional treatment centers often insist that the person in rehab modify their perspectives in such a way to eliminate aspects of personal expression and identity, our approach is to help people recover in a way that is authentic to their belief systems.

Life Experiences

In many circumstances, life experiences play an important role in the onset and development of drug abuse pathology. For example, if a person has emotionally painful, adverse, or negative life experiences they will often seek to “numb” the power of these sensations with alcohol or drugs. If other factors are also present, drug abuse can develop as a coping tool to protect, distract and relieve them from the pain and difficulty of life. Treatment must take into consideration these factors in order to build a process in rehab that addresses the difficulty clients have in staying clean and sober. Our approach is designed to individually build the skills required to deal with these fears and difficulties in a productive and healthy way.

Co-Occurring Disorders

When people have dual diagnosis issues and they aren’t properly treated, they will often attempt to self-medicate these problems with recreational drugs. More often than not this process actually exasperates the severity of these co-occurring disorders. In order to cope with symptoms of depression, anxiety, ADHD or bipolar disorders people will often gravitate towards self-medicative techniques which often result in patterns of drug abuse pathology. Our evidence-based style of treatment is designed to assess and evaluate each client for these underlying issues. Once substantiated, we treat psychiatric and psychological issues with the most advanced clinical and medical techniques available. This allows people to begin to live life with co-occurring disorders in a healthier way than being compelled to self-medicate their symptoms.

We Offer Personalized Treatment

Each person is unique. Without question, what one person will respond do will not always work for another person. Unfortunately, many traditional treatment centers offer rehabilitation with a cookie-cutter approach that allows many people (especially those with dual diagnosis) to slip into the cracks.

We are fundamentally different in this regard. Our entire treatment approach is based on the concept of customized and personal treatment. With a total residential capacity of just 12 people, we can ensure that treatment will be tailored to the unique needs of the individual.

Call to Learn More about the Authentic Recovery Center

The Authentic Recovery Center is a leader in treatment for addiction and psychiatric and psychological disorders. If you think our approach to substance abuse treatment seems right for your situation call 1 877 415 4673 now. Our licensed clinicians will help answer any additional questions you might have about integrated services for drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Remember, “The only failure in life is the failure to act.”



Feb 01 | 2013
Treatment for Problem Gambling
problem-gambling

Compulsive Gambling

Compulsive gambling is an impulse control disorder in which the subject is driven by an overwhelming, uncontrollable urge to gamble. The impulse is progressive and becomes uncontrollable. It consumes more of the individual’s time, energy, and money. It can destroy everything that is meaningful in the person’s life. The compulsive gambler cannot control the impulse to gamble, even when they know their gambling is hurting themselves or their loved ones. Gambling is all they can think about and all they want to do, no matter the consequences. Compulsive gamblers keep gambling whether they’re up or down, broke or flush, happy or depressed. Even when they know the odds are against them, even when they can’t afford to lose, compulsive gamblers are unable to stay out of “action”.

DSM-V Assessment

Below is the DSM-V criterion for problem and compulsive and pathological gamblers:
Persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior as indicated by five (or more) of the following (also known as compulsive or pathological gambling):

Problem gambling is indicated by 3-4 of the following:

  • Is preoccupied with gambling (e.g. preoccupied with reliving past gambling experiences, handicapping or planning the next venture, or thinking of ways to get money with which to gamble).
  • Needs to gamble with increasing amounts of money in order to achieve the desired excitement.
  • Has repeated unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back, or stop gambling.
  • Is restless or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop gambling.
  • Gambles as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.g., feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety, depression).
  • After losing money gambling, often returns another day to get even (“chasing” one’s losses).
  • Lies to family members, therapist, or others to conceal the extent of involvement with gambling.
  • Has committed illegal acts such as forgery, fraud, theft, or embezzlement to finance gambling.
  • Has jeopardized or lost a significant relationship, job, or educational or career opportunity because of gambling.
  • Relies on others to provide money to relieve a desperate financial situation caused by gambling.

Identifying the Problem

We believe that compulsive gambling affects people from all walks of life to the same extent of any other addiction. Whether the gambler bets on sports, buys lottery tickets or scratchers, plays poker, craps (dice), roulette, black-jack or slots, in a casino or online, compulsive gambling can strain relationships, interfere with home and work, and lead to financial catastrophe. Problem gambling can result in social issues, emotional stress, and financial difficulties and can affect relationships, emotional or physical health, work and school. Compulsive gamblers may even do things they would have never thought possible, like stealing money meant for family, friends or embezzling from their employer.

Compulsive Gambling Treatment

The Authentic Recovery Center (ARC) recognizes that gambling is a brain disease and needs to be treated like any other addiction when implementing treatment. ARC DOES NOT treat gambling as an addiction by itself. We treat it as a secondary addiction alongside of alcohol and of drug addiction. If you are looking for treatment for strictly gambling addiction we strongly encourage you to all us for a referral or visit the National Council On Problem Gambling for more information. If however, you also struggle with alcohol and other drugs then fill out our insurance verification form and we can help!

Gambling Statistics

Today nearly every person has gambled at some point in their life. It is estimated that 1-2% of these people will potentially develop a gambling problem. In California alone it is estimated that 4% of the population will develop a gambling problem (approximately 1 million people). California is home to 89 card clubs, 100 tribal casinos, state lottery and racetracks, not to mention the proximity to Las Vegas and Reno.

Criminality and Suicidality

Many gamblers contemplate criminal behavior or become acutely self-destructive if not stopped. The suicide rate for compulsive gamblers is twenty times higher than for non-gamblers (one in five attempts suicide). Many gamblers believe they are unable to stop, but compulsive gambling and gambling addiction are treatable. If the gambler is ready to admit they have a problem and seek help, they can overcome their gambling problem and regain control of their life.

Multidisciplinary Approach

Our rehabilitation model involves intensive individual therapies addressing the roots of the addiction which helps with modifying the behavior. Our qualified therapists that have been trained to work specifically with alcoholics and addicts will work closely with the individual throughout the course of treatment and in some cases when treatment is complete. Compulsive gambling can manifest in many ways, and treatment at ARC is designed to assist in the journey towards treating the problem along with their families and friends who are also suffering.

Gamblers Anonymous

GA provides the message that there is an alternative to the destruction of compulsive gambling. As it states in the GA combo book “No one likes to think they are different from their fellows. Therefore it is not surprising that our gambling careers have been characterized by countless vain attempts to prove we could gamble like other people. The idea that somehow, someday we will control our gambling is the great obsession of every compulsive gambler. The persistence of this illusion is astonishing. Many pursue it to the gates of prison, insanity, or death.” The absolute of this statement is the very experience of the compulsive gambler. Gamblers Anonymous allows us to unify and embark with one another on what may seem too daunting of a task alone. The compulsive gambling treatment program at ARC is within proximity to many meetings in the Los Angeles area. Support with sponsorship, step-work, and routine meetings appropriate to schedule is provided.

Family Program

Many compulsive gamblers and alcoholics/addicts have left a path of immeasurable destruction. The gambler and alcoholic/addict has left a trail of lies and hurt with family and friends. As the client proceeds through treatment the family can feel alone and deserted. At ARC we recognize the reach and severity that addiction has. This provides and opportunity for the family to participate in a treatment of their own. This allows for the affected to partake in the treatment process and evolve when the system is put back in order. Countless times have disoriented functioning family systems claimed that if the identified patient could just get hold of addiction the system would go back to order. This is one of the myths that our intensive family programs can help foster. The family program can give the affected strength, knowledge and a new skill set. The family programs menu of services are as follows:

  • Family Education
  • Family Process Group
  • Relationship/Couples Therapy
  • Family Therapy
  • Multi-Family Process Group
  • Gam-Anon

Problem Gambling is a Brain Disorder

The truth is, compulsive gambling is a brain disease and has been recognized as such by the mental health and medical community. Problem gambling is beginning to be seen and treated as areas of the brain are not working properly; it is no longer a question of morality, creed, or lack of willpower. At ARC we an help as long as there is another addiction present. If you feel that you qualify, please call us today.



Jan 15 | 2013
Sober Living
sober-living-los-angeles

Sober Living

By the time ARC’s residents graduate from our program, they have reached a level of functionality and clarity that they will be able to carry over into their newly sober lives. ARC offers several aftercare treatment options, all of which are tailored specially to target the changing, transitional needs of the addict as they move on from the structured environment of the residential setting. And, since no two people require the same variety of care, it is vital to the maintenance of their long-term recovery that they have as many, fluid options available to them as possible.

We do not offer a Sober Living Environment, or SLE, but we can make recommendations about many facilities all over the country that can meet the needs of the individual. Most of the individuals in our Intensive Outpatient Program are in some form of a local SLE.

Residential Treatment is the Beginning

In other words, ARC offers what are referred to as multiple levels of care, which means that our program is divided into different phases and different categories, with each phase of treatment calibrated to meet the needs of each individual wherever they find themselves on their own treatment continuum. Treatment typically commences with physical detoxification – the period during which the client undergoes a systematic and medically supervised process of ridding their bodies of toxins – after which the client moves through the various levels of the program. Although ARC’s residential treatment programs occur along a phase system, with the client gaining increasingly challenging autonomy as they move forward and participate in their program and recovery, the proposition that they will someday graduate is inadvertently inaccurate. The truth is that graduation from residential treatment, although serving as a bookend of sorts, really indicates that they have completed but the very first inquiries into their own personalities, addictions, and pathology, and that with regards to graduation, their departure from residential care actually inaugurates the next phase of their lives and their personal growth. This is a critical juncture for any addict – regardless of how well behaved or compliant they were while in treatment, or how rebellious and resistant to treatment protocols they demonstrated – the move out of residential care into their respective lives is enormous, and the pressures and stressors they will inevitably contend with will challenge everything they have accomplished during their in-house stay.

Sober Living is an Adjunct Service

As such, different levels of care are provided by ARC, with each variety of services representing, in a general way, whatever stage of growth the addict is at the moment they leave residential care. For some individuals the Intensive Outpatient Program might be the most viable option. For still others, some variety of SLE in conjunction with Aftercare Services might be indicated. Having asserted as much, it then becomes important to find the SLE that best suits the addict’s needs. In practice this is trickier than one might suppose. Because addicts at this phase of their recovery are typically apprehensive or outright terrified, matching them up with a facility that honors their needs is imperative to fostering continued growth and recovery.

Structured Sober Living is Important

Much of the controversy surrounding sober livings is the fact that in the state of California sober homes are not regulated by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs; which means that there exist no real oversight with regards standards of care one can expect from a licensed treatment center. More often than not, residents in the various SLEs we work with, are expected to either be in school, to be working, be looking for work, and participating in aspects of ARC’s various aftercare services, or volunteering. In other words, we expect the SLE to be progressing the individual forward in the same way we do. As an addendum to the aforementioned, ARC works with SLE facilities, all of which ARC vouches for with regards to their provisions of care, their oversight and the integrity of the structure they apply.

Varying Styles of Sober Living

There exists a great deal of misinformation about SLEs, and a moment to clarify their function is important. Sober livings are generally not regulated by onsite staff or therapists, and the expectation is that graduated residents are at a point in their Recovery where they can manage certain of their affairs. One of the most important services that sober living community’s provide is a supportive setting for newly sober addicts that encourage them to foster the life skills and coping strategies that have hitherto been largely theoretical. Features one can expect from a sober living:

  • A clean and sober environment.
  • New positive peer influences.
  • A healthy community lifestyle.
  • A safe place to continue personal and spiritual growth.
  • A place to learn self-supporting principles of recovery.
  • Recommended 12-step involvement for all members of the community.
  • Continued work with a primary care therapist.
  • Participation in ARC’s aftercare and alumni programs, which includes meetings, socializing, group therapy, family therapy, and one-on-one therapy.

Moving On To Independent Living

ARC’s Aftercare program is referred to as “independent living”. This level of care should be viewed as a step-down resource for people who need additional support transitioning out of residential treatment and more specifically Intensive Outpatient. The primary function of independent living is to create a safe resource for individuals that need a degree of structure and accountability, but simultaneously don’t require high levels of maintenance.

Special Workshops, Alumni Services

Some of the ongoing services ARC provide for sober living residents include:

  • Ongoing Life Skills Workshops – ARC’s Life Skills Workshop encompasses a broad spectrum of issues and concerns. Life Skills Workshops provide for people an opportunity to take stock of areas that still need attention, while also receiving support and commendation for what they have accomplished. This element of treatment is invaluable because addicts tend to belittle their accomplishments and embellish their mistakes. Employing group input and observations from peers, in conjunction with positive reinforcement employed by the group leader or therapist, is an invaluable tool to help objectively assess oneself and appraise both their assets and their liabilities. It is not uncommon during this phase for people to begin to identify passions and interests, including vocational and educational aspirations.
  • Continued Alumni Services – ARC’s Alumni Program is specially geared to creating a sense of community between people who have left treatment, but who are at different levels of emotional and psychological development. The nature of the group, and its inherent intimacy, collude to create a unique environment in which Addict’s transitioning out of residential care have a place to acquire support, guidance, and love.

Recommending A Sober Livings in Los Angeles

When people are transitioning from our residential setting to a SLE, we help them by making recommendations based on our experience with sober livings over the last decade. We do this on a case by case basis. There are no kickbacks, perks, or mutual benefits behind any of our referrals, which is part of the reason we don’t list any sober livings on our website. If you are curious about what SLE would work best for you. Call us, or fill out our free insurance verification form and we can find the appropriate sober living that fits you.




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